2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II 
    
    Jan 28, 2023  
2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The information following course titles indicate (1) hours per week of lecture, (2) hours per week of laboratory and (3) semester credit hours. A small number of courses are offered for a variable number of credit hours, and the semester credit hours listed represent the maximum number of hours possible for credit. This will be noted in the course description.

The frequency of offering follows the meeting and credit hour information. Courses offered every year are designated by semester(s) only. Courses offered every other year are designated by semester and odd/even year.

Note: Since most courses are not offered every semester, students should be aware that failure to take a required course when it is offered may delay graduation.

Any course may be offered on demand should sufficient interest be demonstrated and should a qualified instructor be available. “Demand” courses with a defined content will be offered as regularly as practical for the host department.

At the end of the course description, the following information will be given when applicable: laboratory information, corequisites (“simultaneous enrollment”) and prerequisites, cross listed courses (“same as”), special fees, and pertinent information about the use of the course.

Courses and Numbering

All courses are listed alphabetically by course prefix and numerically within each prefix. The department and college assignments are also noted. ACU uses a three-digit course numbering system. Courses numbered 100 to 299 are lower-level courses (primarily for freshmen and sophomores). Courses numbered from 300 to 499 are upper-level, or advanced, courses (primarily for juniors and seniors). Courses numbered 500 to 799 are graduate courses. All courses numbered 000 to 099 do not count toward graduation or GPA.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Some courses have prerequisites, which must be met before a student may register for that course, or corequisites, which must be completed simultaneously. In some cases, a student may have special knowledge, skills or background that will enable him or her to perform well in a given class without meeting its prerequisites or corequisites. Such a student should seek special permission from the department offering the course.

A course may not use the same requirement as both prerequisite and corequisite. Courses listed as corequisite must be taken together. Students may not drop or withdraw from a course with corequisite requirements without dropping or withdrawing from both courses. Students may repeat a course with corequisite requirements alone in subsequent attempts if they fail or do not receive degree credit for the course on the first attempt. However, in courses with a subject code of EACH, EDUC, NURS, or SPAN, students must repeat both corequisite courses if they fail or do not receive credit for one or both courses on the first attempt.

Students should refer to the most recent catalog for course corequisites, prerequisites, and restrictions.

Course Sequencing

Some courses have recommendations of a previous course(s) for appropriate sequencing. Such recommendations are not prerequisites; the system will allow any student meeting a course’s prerequisites to enroll for a course regardless of whether the student meets the sequencing recommendations. Students are cautioned, however, to follow sequencing recommendations when all of the courses in the sequence are on their degree plans.

Independent Study and Special Topics Courses

Neither an independent study nor a special topics course should be a version or instance of a course that already has been approved for inclusion in the catalog.

Independent Study

An independent study course is a unique, student-initiated and student-driven course. An independent study course should be used to enhance a degree. It should be used as a substitution for degree requirements only in rare circumstances; it should not be used to correct poor planning. All other catalog policies apply.

Independent study courses are usually designed to be worth 3 credit hours. Ideally, independent study courses should make up no more than 6 hours (5 percent) of any student’s undergraduate degree. They should make up no more than 20 percent of any student’s graduate degree. Independent study courses should use the even hundred course number appropriate to the level of study (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, etc.)

Student proposals for independent studies may be approved or denied based on faculty interest or availability and departmental priorities. Students in the Doctor of Ministry (DMin) program will incur a separate fee for an independent study course and should contact the Director of the DMin Program for details.

When proposing an independent study, the student should complete the Independent Study Request form and discuss it – including the outcomes and artifacts of the study – with the proposed faculty member. Artifacts should support the student’s and the faculty member’s intended outcomes for the course through research, written work, creative projects, and/or professional projects. If the course is approved by the faculty member, the faculty member is responsible for creating the syllabus for the independent study. The syllabus must include the learning outcomes and how they will be measured.

The syllabus and Independent Study Request form should be submitted to the chair and dean on a timeline that would allow for the proposal to be approved or denied prior to the beginning of the term or part of term in which the course is being proposed. Study Abroad courses should be approved prior to departure from the United States.

Special topics

A special topics course is faculty/department-initiated and faculty-driven. A special topics course will be included in the course schedule for registration in a given term and could be used as a pilot for addition to the curriculum. A substitution form must be submitted for a special topics course to satisfy degree requirement. All other catalog policies apply.

The special topics syllabus must be submitted to the dean before March 1 for a fall course or October 1 for a spring or summer course, so that it will be available for student registration. Special topics courses should choose the course number appropriate to the level of study from the following: 140, 240, 340, 440, 540, 640, 740, etc.

The Texas Common Course Numbering System

The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) has been designed for the purpose of aiding students in the transfer of general academic courses between colleges and universities throughout Texas. Common courses are freshman and sophomore academic credit courses that have been identified as common by institutions that are members of the common course numbering system. The system ensures that if the student takes the courses the receiving institution designates as common, then the courses will be accepted in transfer.

For further information contact the transfer course coordinator in the Registrar’s Office.

 

Nursing

  
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    NURS 754 - DNP Project II


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1.5
    This course integrates principles of evidence-based research, improvement science, and information technology into the analysis and evaluation of a DNP project. Theoretical frameworks which provide direction for DNP projects are also considered. Students analyze and disseminate findings of their implementation plan used to address the problem of interest identified in a literature review developed in Advanced Research and Statistics and methodology completed in DNP Project I. Prerequisite: NURS 752 , evidence of IRB Project Approval Letter, and completed/passed Proposal Defense. Course fee.
  
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    NURS 756 - DNP Project III


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1.5
    This course is the second phase of the final course in the program. Students complete final edits to their project papers and prepare for editorial review and publication in the university’s Digital Commons database. Students also work on a manuscript for publication of their project findings that provides a brief overview of their project results and plans for contributions to nursing and medical sciences. Prerequisite: NURS 754 .

Nutrition

  
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    NUTR 120 - Nutrition and Wellness


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Addresses current trends in nutrition (information and misinformation), food safety, world nutrition and hunger issues, and the impact of nutrients, diet, and weight control on health. It empowers the students to ask questions concerning nutrition and seek answers appropriately. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
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    NUTR 221 - Introductory Nutrition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Nutritional needs of various age groups and the influence of socioeconomic, cultural, and psychological factors on food and nutrition behavior presented in a descriptive survey of nutrient requirements and utilization by the human body.
  
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    NUTR 222 - Food Selection and Preparation


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Study of basic food science and culinary techniques. The student will demonstrate basic food preparation and presentation. Provides working knowledge of food selection, food safety and sanitation, pleasurable eating, sensory evaluation of food, and food regulations.
  
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    NUTR 224 - Nutrition for Exercise and Sport


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Provides comprehensive, accurate, and up-to-date information concerning basic fundamentals of how the active individual can achieve optimal nutrition by fueling before, during, and after exercising. Examines how the athlete can use nutrition to achieve peak performance.
  
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    NUTR 322 - Biochemistry of Nutrition I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Focuses on normal nutrition and physiological function. Applies biochemistry to nutrient use from consumption through digestion, absorption, distribution, and cellular metabolism. It integrates life processes from the cellular level through the multisystem operation of the whole organism. Prerequisite: CHEM 111 /CHEM 113  and CHEM 112 /CHEM 114  or CHEM 131 /CHEM 133  and CHEM 132 /CHEM 134 , BIOL 291 /BIOL 293  and BIOL 292 /BIOL 294 , and NUTR 221 .
  
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    NUTR 323 - Biochemistry of Nutrition II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring only

    Applies biochemistry to nutrient use from consumption through digestion, absorption, distribution, and cellular metabolism and integrates physiological processes from the cellular level through the multisystem operation of the whole organism. Prerequisite: NUTR 221 , NUTR 322 ; CHEM 112 /CHEM 114  or CHEM 132 /CHEM 134 .
  
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    NUTR 325 - Quantity Food Production and Service


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Provides working knowledge of food consumption issues and trends, menu planning, purchasing and procurement of food and equipment. Scheduling, food production, and delivery systems are addressed. The student will demonstrate ability to perform recipe modification and cost. Field experience required.
  
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    NUTR 327 - Nutrition Through the Life Cycle


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    The study of each life cycle stage concerning nutritional foundations that are essential for positive development and health. It addresses the role of nutrition and factors that influence nutritional status. Nutrition assessment and disease states for each life cycle are studied. Prerequisite: NUTR 221 .
  
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    NUTR 328 - Community Nutrition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Study of public policy development and current nutrition issues affecting public health. Provides working knowledge of assessment and treatment of nutritional health risks, food availability and access, and community nutrition programs. The student will demonstrate the ability to screen individuals for nutritional risk and determine nutrient needs of individuals and groups in the community. Prerequisite: NUTR 221 .
  
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    NUTR 401 - Nutrition Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Explores professional aspects of employment including health care policy and administration, code of ethics, standards of practice, performance improvement, and reimbursement issues. Personal portfolio will be developed. Required of nutrition majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing. A capstone course.
  
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    NUTR 421 - Nutrition Assessment and Education


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Provides information concerning objective measures of nutritional status and determination of responsiveness to medical nutritional therapy. Dietary counseling techniques are explored. Prerequisite: NUTR 221  and junior standing. A capstone and writing-intensive course.
  
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    NUTR 423 - Food Safety


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Provides accurate, science-based information on all aspects of handling food and incorporates the latest Food and Drug Administration Food Code in a realistic manner. The nationally recognized ServSafe examination by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation will be administered for certification. Prerequisite: NUTR 222 .
  
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    NUTR 425 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Provides working knowledge of pathophysiology related to nutrition care, medical nutrition therapies, assessment of need for adaptive feeding techniques, and nutritional pharmacology. The student will demonstrate the ability to interpret medical terminology and laboratory parameters, calculate and define therapeutic diets, determine nutrient requirements, and calculate enteral and parenteral formulations. Prerequisite: BIOL 291 /BIOL 293 , BIOL 292 /BIOL 294 ; NUTR 322 .
  
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    NUTR 426 - Food Science


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Study of experimental methodology, food additives and preservatives, principles of food processing, and biotechnology. Provides working knowledge of sensory and objective evaluation of foods. The student will demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of functions of ingredients in food. Prerequisite: NUTR 222 .
  
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    NUTR 427 - Food System Organization and Administration


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Study of management theories and leadership. Provides working knowledge of financial management including interpretation of financial data, determination of costs, and budget preparation. Field experience required.
  
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    NUTR 428 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall only

    Provides working knowledge of pathophysiology related to nutrition care, medical nutrition therapies, assessment of need for adaptive feeding techniques, and nutritional pharmacology, including interpreting medical terminology and laboratory parameters, determining nutrient requirements, and calculating therapeutic diets and enteral and parenteral formulations. Prerequisite: BIOL 292 /BIOL 294 ; CHEM 112 /CHEM 114  or CHEM 132 /CHEM 134 ; NUTR 322 , NUTR 323 , and NUTR 425 .
  
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    NUTR 429 - Medical Nutrition Therapy III


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 5
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Provides working knowledge of health behaviors, ethics of care, reimbursement issues, health care policies, and quality improvement methods. The student will demonstrate the ability to complete comprehensive nutrition assessments, measure, calculate, and interpret body composition data, make appropriate nutritional recommendations, counsel patients concerning nutrition, and provide appropriate documentation. Field experience hours in a clinical setting required. Prerequisite: NUTR 428 .
  
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    NUTR 450 - Capstone in Dietetics


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    In-depth study of domains of the Registration Examination for Dietitians. Students assess their learning needs and research topics to enhance critical thinking and application skills in the domains of Food and Nutrition, Clinical and Community Nutrition, Nutrition Diagnosis, Education and Research, Food and Nutrition Systems, and Management. This course should be taken the spring before graduation. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the NDPD concentration of the Nutrition major. A capstone course.
  
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    NUTR 620 - Dietetic Internship


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Provides working knowledge of the domains of dietetics: principles of dietetics, nutrition care for individuals and groups, management of food and nutrition programs and services, and food service systems. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics Requirements and B.S. degree in Nutrition or related field. Must be admitted to the ACU Dietetic Internship. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours of credit. Course fee.
  
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    NUTR 621 - Nutrition Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Overview of the research process used to enhance evidence-based knowledge in the field of nutrition. Includes use of literature reviews, formulation of research questions and study designs, managing a nutritional study, preparing surveys and interviews, and interpreting quantitative and qualitative data. Formulation of research proposal and obtaining IRB approval. Prerequisite: Enrolled in Abilene Christian University’s Dietetic Internship Certificate program.
  
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    NUTR 622 - Weight Management I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Provides working knowledge of pathophysiology, medical nutrition therapies, pharmacology, and surgical procedures related to overweight and obesity. The nutrition care process will be utilized throughout all aspects of nutritional care. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 623 - Nutrition and Poverty


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Nutritional effects of poverty in the US and developing countries on physical, education and emotional status of individuals and families. Impacts of government and non-profit programs (including WIC, Food Stamps, and food banks) on nutritional outcomes. Students apply appropriate methods of assisting families with nutritional food choices and budgeting. Prerequisite: Enrolled in Abilene Christian University’s Dietetic Internship Certificate Program.
  
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    NUTR 624 - Weight Management II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    This course provides working knowledge related to overweight and obesity therapies including physical activity, pharmacology, and bariatric surgical procedures. Fad diets and dietary supplements for weight loss will be reviewed. The nutrition care process will be utilized. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 625 - School Nutrition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Students develop skills needed to direct a school nutrition program by providing healthy meal choices, nutrition education for students, and marketing plans that enhance the goals of school nutrition in a cost-effective manner while adhering to all federal and state regulations. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 626 - Nutrition Assessment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course provides comprehensive information concerning the role of nutritional assessment in disease prevention and progression and information concerning objective and subjective measures of nutritional status, including anthropometrics, biochemical measurements, clinical parameters, and dietary assessment.
  
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    NUTR 627 - Nutrition for Diabetes Mellitus


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course provides information concerning first-line therapy for diabetes, medical nutrition therapy. Current evidence-based recommendations and interventions are presented for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes for different age groups and complicating conditions. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 628 - Nutrition Education and Counseling


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Students design effective nutrition education presentations appropriate for different ages and lifestyles. Motivational interviewing and behavior theories are used to guide clients to improved nutrition behaviors. Appropriate evaluations are designed to measure effectiveness of education and counseling approaches. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 629 - Nutrition and Integrative Medicine


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    This course equips dieticians and others providing nutritional advice to look at human beings as whole persons. Individual nutritional needs are affected by genetics, environment, dietary choices, exercise, and lifestyle patterns as well as stress and trauma. Evidence-based research includes digestive, absorptive, and hormonal imbalances.
  
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    NUTR 632 - Nutrition for Eating Disorders


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course provides an overview of the various eating disorders, evidence-based treatment therapies, specific counseling techniques that are effective with clients, and tips for working with families. Students utilize case studies and current peer-reviewed journal articles to evaluate various approaches while developing a personal philosophy of treating Eating Disorders.
  
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    NUTR 633 - Nutritional Genomics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course provides information concerning how diet and genotype interactions affect phenotype. Students will learn to apply nutritional genomics through interpretation of genetic test results and to make personalized nutrition recommendations that result in health benefits and not harm to individuals. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 634 - Practice Skills and Current Issues


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course provides instruction in honing skills for entry-level dietetics in various areas of the field. Regulations affecting dietetics are reviewed. The Code of Ethics, Scope of Practice, and Standards of Professional Performance are applied to practice. Current issues will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Completion of Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements.
  
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    NUTR 635 - Nutrition for Exercise and Sport


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Provides comprehensive, evidence-based information concerning fundamentals of how the active individual can achieve optimal nutrition by appropriate fueling for various sports and activity choices. Includes information on body composition, energy balance, food choices, and supplements before, during, and after exercise. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance for progression into the Master of Athletic Training program or completion of the Didactic Program in Dietetics at an accredited university and admission to the graduate school at ACU.

Occupational Therapy

  
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    OCCT 601 - Musculoskeletal Anatomy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn the core content of human musculoskeletal anatomy with an emphasis on upper extremity anatomy. Comprehend kinesthetic principles of movement in normal populations to provide a foundation to later apply to diseased or abnormal anatomy. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 291  and BIOL 292  or equivalent of Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labs (8 hours).
  
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    OCCT 603 - Foundations of OT


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn the concept of occupation based on the historical and theoretical foundations of the occupational therapy profession. Learn standards of practice, practice framework, values, and responsibilities of the occupational therapy practitioner. Engage in events to promote advocacy and awareness of profession. Lecture.
  
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    OCCT 605 - Theory in OT


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    In this course, the learner will critique and discuss many of the theoretical perspectives commonly used in occupational therapy practice, including those that focus on occupation-based practice. This course will also provide students the opportunity to apply theoretical perspectives to occupational therapy assessment and treatment planning, compare and contrast theoretical perspectives, and make an educated decision about which perspectives best meet the needs of the client and the frame work of the profession. The overarching theme of the course is the importance of occupation in the promotion of health and the prevention of disease and disability.
  
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    OCCT 607 - Intro to Making


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn the process of innovation as it relates to design theory, assistive technology, and activity analysis to support occupational performance, participation, health, and well-being of occupational therapy clients. Conduct activity analyses and complete design projects for varied client needs. Lecture and lab.
  
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    OCCT 611 - Adult Populations in OT I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This is the first of two courses to learn occupational therapy assessment, evaluation, and intervention skills based on applicable theoretical reasoning for the adult client that is limited in occupations due to physical and or cognitive impairments. Lecture and lab combined.
  
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    OCCT 617 - Social Conditions


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn the process of service and advocacy as it relates to the occupational performance, participation, health, and well-being of at-risk populations. Engage in service learning inclusive of case studies and reflective journals to examine clients who are at risk for experiencing social injustice and/or occupational deprivation due to various global, social, and political factors. Lecture and field experience.
  
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    OCCT 631 - Neuroscience


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Learn the core structure and function of the brain and how these apply to the development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral sensory skills, and functions. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: Life Span Development and OCCT 603 .
  
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    OCCT 635 - OT in Pediatrics


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Develop essential knowledge, attitudes, and skills in occupational therapy practice for pediatric populations. Acquire clinical reasoning and hands-on abilities in occupational therapy assessment, intervention planning, and implementation methods for pediatric populations. Lecture and lab.
  
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    OCCT 637 - Research Process in OT I


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Learn the processes of innovation for a continued development of a body of knowledge through research for occupational therapy practice, quantitative and qualitative research methods. Produce valid evidence-based reviews of occupational therapy practices and explore scientific literature related to occupational therapy. Lecture. Corequisite: OCCT 643  
  
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    OCCT 639 - Adult Populations in OT II


    Lecture Hours: 5
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 6
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Learn occupational therapy assessment, evaluation, and intervention skills based on applicable theoretical reasoning for the adult client that is limited in occupations due to physical and/or cognitive impairments. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: Life Span Development and OCCT 603 .
  
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    OCCT 641 - Health Conditions Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Learn core content of common medical conditions that benefit from occupational therapy services. Presentation will include guest lectures from local physicians in their area of specialty. Learn ways that clients access occupational therapy services, the role of occupational therapy in health literacy, and use of telehealth in occupational therapy. Lecture and seminar. Prerequisite: Life Span Development.
  
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    OCCT 643 - Mentored Research


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring, Summer as needed

    Initiate the processes of innovation through scholarly inquiry by engagement in research relevant to occupational therapy. Under the tutelage of a faculty mentor, conduct a review of literature and design a research proposal. Seminar. Corequisite: OCCT 637  
  
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    OCCT 651 - OT for Mental Health and Wellness


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Learn occupational therapy assessment, evaluation, and intervention skills based on applicable theoretical reasoning in mental health. Identify and perform mental health assessments as they correlate with common behavioral health disorders and their effect on occupation. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: Abnormal Psychology.
  
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    OCCT 655 - Mental Health and Wellness Fieldwork Level 1 and Documentation


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Learn features of practice settings, documentation practice of occupational therapy for mental health and community settings. Through field experiences, acquire beginning competency in application of occupational therapy clinical reasoning and intervention implementation and develop an understanding of the needs of the client in this population. Accurately reflect this reasoning in documentation. Field experience and seminar. Prerequisite: OCCT 617 , OCCT 603 , OCCT 601 , OCCT 607 , OCCT 690 , OCCT 637 , OCCT 639 .
  
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    OCCT 661 - Hand and Upper Extremity Conditions


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn assessment, evaluation, and intervention skills for common conditions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand that limit occupation. Learn use of therapeutic modalities. Fabricate commonly used orthoses. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: OCCT 601  and OCCT 639 .
  
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    OCCT 670 - Group Process


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Learn the process of group development and dynamics including communication, conflict resolution, and the influence of culture and contexts on group process. Learn to effectively utilize a service-based approach and therapeutic use of self with psychosocial frames of reference and theories of group development while actively leading and participating in group activities. Lecture. Prerequisite: OCCT 603 , OCCT 607 , OCCT 617 , OCCT 639 , OCCT 641 .
  
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    OCCT 690 - Physical Disabilities Fieldwork Level I and Documentation


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Learn concepts of therapeutic use of self, teamwork, communication, and documentation in the practice of occupational therapy for adult populations. Thorough field experiences, acquire beginning competency in application of occupational therapy clinical reasoning and intervention implementation and an understanding of the needs of the client in this population. Accurately reflect this reasoning in documentation. Field experience and seminar. Prerequisite: OCCT 601 , OCCT 603 , OCCT 607 , and OCCT 617 .
  
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    OCCT 695 - Pediatrics Fieldwork Level I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn features of prevalent diagnoses and practice setting in the practice of occupational therapy for pediatric populations. Through field experiences, acquire beginning competency in application of occupational therapy clinical reasoning and intervention implementation. Accurately reflect this reasoning in documentation. Field experience and seminar. Prerequisite: Human and Life Span Development; OCCT 690 .
  
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    OCCT 703 - Implementing OT Treatment


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Application of theoretical constructs to real-time practice of occupational therapy. Reflect and analyze own performance for competency in occupational therapy evaluation and ongoing intervention within an inter-professional context. Discuss appropriate mechanisms for referring, addressing, monitoring, and reassessing of the needs of the client, caregivers, colleagues, healthcare providers, and the public. Online course concurrent with 12-week fieldwork level II placement. Prerequisite: OCCT 639 , OCCT 635 , and OCCT 661 .
  
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    OCCT 711 - Ethical and Professional Decision Making in OT


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Learn of ethical standards that govern the practice of occupational therapy and strategies for ethical decision-making to promote authenticity in the practice of occupational therapy. Lecture. Prerequisite: OCCT 603 , OCCT 639 , OCCT 635 , OCCT 651 , and OCCT 661 .
  
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    OCCT 735 - Research Process in OT II


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Participate in the processes of innovation through scholarly inquiry by engagement in research relevant to occupational therapy. Under the tutelage of a faculty mentor, design a research proposal, participate in implementation, document, and present research results. Learn the basics of research funding. Seminar. Prerequisite: Statistics; OCCT 637 .
  
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    OCCT 739 - Management and Leadership in OT


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Plan and manage the delivery of authentic evidence and occupation-based therapy services that are efficacious, cost-effective, and provided within the varying contexts of a dynamic healthcare environment. Employ professional, collaborative skills to integrate input from multiple systems, business models, and governing structures into the planned delivery of occupational therapy services and support for the profession. Lecture. Prerequisite: OCCT 711 .
  
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    OCCT 790 - Fieldwork Level II


    Lecture Hours: 6
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Delivery of occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on service, authenticity, innovation, and competency development. Develop entry-level practice skills delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on the application of evidence-based, purposeful, and meaningful occupations while integrating psychosocial factors influencing engagement in occupation. Field experience. Prerequisite: OCCT 690 , OCCT 655 , and OCCT 695 .
  
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    OCCT 791 - Professional Preparation


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Engage in authentic conversation through lecture and faculty advising about professional development and individual strengths and weaknesses. Design a professional development plan for entering into the second fieldwork level II rotation and entering the profession of OT. Lecture and seminar. Prerequisite: Completion of ACU MSOT curriculum.
  
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    OCCT 795 - Fieldwork Level II


    Lecture Hours: 6
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Delivery of occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on service, authenticity, innovation, and competency development. Develop entry-level practice skills delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on the application of evidence-based, purposeful, and meaning occupations while integrating psychosocial factors influencing engagement in occupation. Field experience. Prerequisite: OCCT 690 , OCCT 655 , OCCT 695 , and OCCT 790 .

Peace and Social Justice

  
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    PSJS 499 - Peace and Social Justice Capstone


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    As a non-classroom course, the capstone is based on a service-learning experience at a non-profit or public organization that will require students to reflect on justice and peace through a substantial paper. A capstone course.

Physical Education Activity

  
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    PEAC 100 - Lifetime Wellness


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Examines the components of health fitness. Evaluates one’s current status and shows how to develop and maintain a healthful lifestyle. This is an activity class. Fulfills KINE University Requirements.
  
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    PEAC 101 - Fitness in Action


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course is designed to allow students to improve physical fitness in a self-paced format by utilizing the Fitness Key system in the Student Recreation and Wellness Center. Course fee. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 102 - Sport Activity for Athletes


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1.5
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Techniques and strategies of sport. Skill development. For athletes only. Prerequisite: Must be an NCAA athlete. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 202 - Adapted Physical Activity


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Individualized rehabilitation and fitness program designed for students with specialized needs or considerations. Emphasis on improving fitness levels relative to the individual’s needs and goals. May be substituted for a general activity course. Fulfills KINE activity requirement. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.
  
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    PEAC 203 - Ballet


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A practical class for developing ballet technique and performance skills. This course explores the athleticism and artistry of ballet through class elements of barre and center floor progressing to work with artistry, musicality, and performance skills through variations. Students will create their own movement compositions. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 204 - Modern Dance


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course explores various modern movement styles, creating body awareness and working towards efficiency of movement. Classwork highlights weight shifts, body articulation, on/off balance work, momentum, transitions, musicality, traveling, breath, performance skills, and composition. Students are exposed to theories, practices, and experiences to create their own original movement compositions. Fulfills KINE requirement.
  
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    PEAC 205 - Yoga


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in the practice of Hatha/ Flow Yoga. General philosophy, history, and benefits toward wellness will be included. The performance of asanas (postures) and prayamas (breathing exercises) in order to improve wellness will be emphasized. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 206 - Strength Training


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Theory and practice involving the development of muscular strength and muscular endurance. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 207 - Martial Arts


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Introduces the student to the basic concepts and techniques of self-defense. The student will learn to perform practical and traditional martial arts techniques. Special fee required. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 210 - Cycling


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An introduction to the use of the bicycle for fitness and recreation. Personal bicycle required. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 211 - Cross-Training


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A conditioning course that focuses on both cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength and endurance. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 212 - Beginning Badminton


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in fundamentals and practice. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 214 - Aerobics


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction and practice in rhythmic aerobic activities. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 215 - Jogging for Fitness


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in fitness jogging for both present and lifetime use. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 216 - Walking for Fitness


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in fitness walking for both present and lifetime use. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 217 - Beginning Tennis


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in fundamentals and practice. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 219 - Golf


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in fundamentals and practice. Course fee. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 222 - Physical Activities for Elementary


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in physical fitness activities, motor skills, rhythmic activities, games, sports, and sequential gymnastic and tumbling skills. Designed for interdisciplinary studies elementary majors. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 224 - Disc Golf


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Introduces fundamentals of disc golf, emphasizing improving personal skills through practice, technique. And implementation of basic strategies. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 226 - Water Aerobics


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Vigorous aquatic activities to attain/maintain aerobic fitness. Excellent alternative to the pounding of “land aerobics.” Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 227 - Marathon Training


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Instruction and training to complete a marathon, generally geared to the first time marathoner. Fulfills KINE activity requirement. Additional cost required, for periodic joggers to consistent runners.
  
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    PEAC 228 - Swimming for Fitness


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course focuses on fitness activities in water - a great choice for those who enjoy swimming and cross training. Students will build cardiorespiratory endurance, improve stroke mechanics and learn new strokes. Designed for those who can swim, but interested non-swimmers may contact the instructor for approval to enroll. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 229 - Lifeguard Training


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Designed for swimmers. Instruction in strokes, safety, and water rescue. Lifeguard training certification meets the requirements of most pool facilities hiring lifeguards. Special fee required. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 234 - Pickleball


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in the fundamentals and practice. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 235 - Bowling


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Instruction in the fundamentals and practice. Course fee. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 237 - Beginning Racquetball


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Fundamental theory and practice. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 239 - Snow Skiing


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Special fee and trip required after the end of the semester. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 335 - Beginning Officiating


    Lecture Hours: 1.5
    Lab Hours: 1.5
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course provides the study of officiating requirements for sports and games with an emphasis on mechanics, rule interpretation, code of ethics, and enforcement. Fulfills KINE activity requirement. Course fee.
  
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    PEAC 341 - Scuba Diving


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Instruction in beginning skills, equipment, and safe diving techniques. Special fee required. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 350 - Backpacking


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Special fee and trip required. Trip scheduled for mid-semester - missing three days of classes. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 351 - Canoe Camping


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Special fee and trip required after the end of the semester. Student may not enroll in summer course without special permission. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 352 - Advanced Snow Skiing


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Special fee and trip required. Trip scheduled for mid-semester - missing three days of classes. Fulfills KINE activity requirement.
  
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    PEAC 353 - Advanced Dance Technique Practicum


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Students serve as demonstrators, providing leadership while developing ballet technical proficiency and performance skills. This course explores the athleticism and artistry of ballet through class elements or barre and center floor progressing working with artistry, musicality, and performance skills through variations. Students create their own movement compositions. Prerequisite: PEAC 203 , PEAC 204 , and placement audition. Fulfills KINE requirement.

Physics

  
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    PHYS 101 - Astronomy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Covers history, development, observational techniques, solar, planetary, stellar, galactic, and cosmological aspects of astronomy. Requires some observation and lab work. May be used to satisfy University Requirements. For non-science majors.
  
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    PHYS 102 - Physical Science


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Topics include scientific methods, matter and energy, laws of motion, light, basic relativity theory, structure of the atom, nuclear power and processes, chemical reactions, and others. Applications to societal issues such as pollution, energy resources, medicines, and consumer goods will also be mentioned. May be used to satisfy University Requirements. For non-science majors.
  
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    PHYS 110 - General Physics I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Summer

    Principles of mechanics, heat, and sound. An algebra-based physics course, designed primarily for liberal arts and pre-medical and pre-dental students. Simultaneous enrollment in PHYS 111  is highly suggested. Prerequisite: MATH 109  or MATW 109 , MATH 124 , or MATH 185 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
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    PHYS 111 - General Physics I Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Summer

    May be used to satisfy University Requirements. Course fee.
  
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    PHYS 112 - General Physics II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

    Electricity, magnetism, light, biophysics, and some modern physics. Simultaneous enrollment in PHYS 113  is highly suggested. Prerequisite: PHYS 110 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
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    PHYS 113 - General Physics II Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

    May be used to satisfy University Requirements. Course fee.
  
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    PHYS 135 - Introduction to Electric Circuits


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Basic electrical measurements and devices, introductory electronics. Emphasis on lab work. Intended for those who will use electronic instruments and methods in their profession. Prerequisite: Passing MATH 124  or testing into MATH 185  or higher on the mathematics placement exam. Corequisite: PHYS 136 . Same as ENGR 135 .
 

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