2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II 
    
    Jul 19, 2024  
2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The information following course titles indicate (1) hours per week of lecture, (2) hours per week of laboratory and (3) semester credit hours. A small number of courses are offered for a variable number of credit hours, and the semester credit hours listed represent the maximum number of hours possible for credit. This will be noted in the course description.

The frequency of offering follows the meeting and credit hour information. Courses offered every year are designated by semester(s) only. Courses offered every other year are designated by semester and odd/even year.

Note: Since most courses are not offered every semester, students should be aware that failure to take a required course when it is offered may delay graduation.

Any course may be offered on demand should sufficient interest be demonstrated and should a qualified instructor be available. “Demand” courses with a defined content will be offered as regularly as practical for the host department.

At the end of the course description, the following information will be given when applicable: laboratory information, corequisites (“simultaneous enrollment”) and prerequisites, cross listed courses (“same as”), special fees, and pertinent information about the use of the course.

Courses and Numbering

All courses are listed alphabetically by course prefix and numerically within each prefix. The department and college assignments are also noted. ACU uses a three-digit course numbering system. Courses numbered 100 to 299 are lower-level courses (primarily for freshmen and sophomores). Courses numbered from 300 to 499 are upper-level, or advanced, courses (primarily for juniors and seniors). Courses numbered 500 to 799 are graduate courses. All courses numbered 000 to 099 do not count toward graduation or GPA.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Some courses have prerequisites, which must be met before a student may register for that course, or corequisites, which must be completed simultaneously. In some cases, a student may have special knowledge, skills or background that will enable him or her to perform well in a given class without meeting its prerequisites or corequisites. Such a student should seek special permission from the department offering the course.

A course may not use the same requirement as both prerequisite and corequisite. Courses listed as corequisite must be taken together. Students may not drop or withdraw from a course with corequisite requirements without dropping or withdrawing from both courses. Students may repeat a course with corequisite requirements alone in subsequent attempts if they fail or do not receive degree credit for the course on the first attempt. However, in courses with a subject code of EACH, EDUC, NURS, or SPAN, students must repeat both corequisite courses if they fail or do not receive credit for one or both courses on the first attempt.

Students should refer to the most recent catalog for course corequisites, prerequisites, and restrictions.

Course Sequencing

Some courses have recommendations of a previous course(s) for appropriate sequencing. Such recommendations are not prerequisites; the system will allow any student meeting a course’s prerequisites to enroll for a course regardless of whether the student meets the sequencing recommendations. Students are cautioned, however, to follow sequencing recommendations when all of the courses in the sequence are on their degree plans.

Independent Study and Special Topics Courses

Neither an independent study nor a special topics course should be a version or instance of a course that already has been approved for inclusion in the catalog.

Independent Study

An independent study course is a unique, student-initiated and student-driven course. An independent study course should be used to enhance a degree. It should be used as a substitution for degree requirements only in rare circumstances; it should not be used to correct poor planning. All other catalog policies apply.

Independent study courses are usually designed to be worth 3 credit hours. Ideally, independent study courses should make up no more than 6 hours (5 percent) of any student’s undergraduate degree. They should make up no more than 20 percent of any student’s graduate degree. Independent study courses should use the even hundred course number appropriate to the level of study (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, etc.)

Student proposals for independent studies may be approved or denied based on faculty interest or availability and departmental priorities. Students in the Doctor of Ministry (DMin) program will incur a separate fee for an independent study course and should contact the Director of the DMin Program for details.

When proposing an independent study, the student should complete the Independent Study Request form and discuss it – including the outcomes and artifacts of the study – with the proposed faculty member. Artifacts should support the student’s and the faculty member’s intended outcomes for the course through research, written work, creative projects, and/or professional projects. If the course is approved by the faculty member, the faculty member is responsible for creating the syllabus for the independent study. The syllabus must include the learning outcomes and how they will be measured.

The syllabus and Independent Study Request form should be submitted to the chair and dean on a timeline that would allow for the proposal to be approved or denied prior to the beginning of the term or part of term in which the course is being proposed. Study Abroad courses should be approved prior to departure from the United States.

Special topics

A special topics course is faculty/department-initiated and faculty-driven. A special topics course will be included in the course schedule for registration in a given term and could be used as a pilot for addition to the curriculum. A substitution form must be submitted for a special topics course to satisfy degree requirement. All other catalog policies apply.

The special topics syllabus must be submitted to the dean before March 1 for a fall course or October 1 for a spring or summer course, so that it will be available for student registration. Special topics courses should choose the course number appropriate to the level of study from the following: 140, 240, 340, 440, 540, 640, 740, etc.

The Texas Common Course Numbering System

The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) has been designed for the purpose of aiding students in the transfer of general academic courses between colleges and universities throughout Texas. Common courses are freshman and sophomore academic credit courses that have been identified as common by institutions that are members of the common course numbering system. The system ensures that if the student takes the courses the receiving institution designates as common, then the courses will be accepted in transfer.

For further information contact the transfer course coordinator in the Registrar’s Office.

 

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 542 - Applied Sports Psychology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Development of knowledge and skill in the application of psychology to the enhancement of sport and exercise performance and to the personal development of the athlete.
  
  • PSYC 571 - Behavior Modification


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    An introduction to behavior and cognitive-behavior therapy. Major topics include learning foundations and theoretical bases. Therapy techniques, applications to specific clinical problems, prominent research, and ethics are also considered.
  
  • PSYC 572 - Child Abuse: Recognition and Response


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, spring

    Focuses on identification, reporting, intervention, and prevention of child sexual abuse, physical abuse, and neglect. Special attention will be given to the roles of different disciplines including nursing, social work, education, and psychology.
  
  • PSYC 573 - Characteristics and Needs of Exceptional Children


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    A survey of the nature and needs of exceptional children, such as the mentally retarded, gifted, and emotionally disturbed.
  
  • PSYC 574 - Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Children


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A study of social and emotional problems in children and adolescents including intervention and prevention strategies.
  
  • PSYC 576 - Psychology of Mental Retardation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    The nature and characteristics of mental retardation and its social, emotional, and cognitive aspects.
  
  • PSYC 592 - Child Psychology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An advanced course in the study of children and adolescents, including physical, emotional, cognitive, moral, and social development.
  
  • PSYC 608 - School Psychology: Organization, Operations and Ethics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course introduces students to the field of school psychology. The history, systems, roles and functions of school psychologists are discussed. Readings in contemporary issues and historical events provide the foundation for graduate preparation in school psychology. Significant pre-practicum field experience in schools is required in order to obtain knowledge and experience about the organization and operation of schools. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 610 - Psychotherapy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Studies the problems involved in diagnostic interviewing, case conceptualization, treatment planning, and evaluating treatment effectiveness. Develops specific skills in basic psychological intervention problems. Laboratory graded and credited with the course. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 611 - Introduction to Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An introduction to research methods and their application to research problems.
  
  • PSYC 612 - Clinical Research Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, spring

    An emphasis on the conceptualization, design, completion, and evaluation of research in clinical, counseling, and school psychology. Attention is also given to philosophy of science, formulating questions in applied research, choosing appropriate statistical tests, and presenting results in a professional manner.
  
  • PSYC 613 - Psychopharmacology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course addresses the most recent neurochemical models used to explain the major psychological illnesses. These models are used to provide an overview of the use of psychoactive drugs to restore mental health and to address the abuse of drugs to restore mental health and to address the abuse of drugs that alter mental processes.
  
  • PSYC 620 - Group Psychotherapy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Intended to provide training and exposure to techniques in group interventions. Reviews historical perspectives, popular treatment techniques, empirical evidence on treatment efficacy, ethical and legal issues, and integration considerations. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required, PSYC 610 .
  
  • PSYC 624 - Social and Cultural Bases of Behavior


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Study of classic and contemporary theories and empirical research of social and cultural foundations of behavior and their impact on the therapeutic relationship, competencies and standards, and culture specific knowledge. Emphasizing social cognition, stereotypes and prejudice, group processes, conformity, and gender/ethnic psychology.
  
  • PSYC 625 - Seminar in Intercultural Studies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Observation and analysis of human behavior in small groups. Abstraction of taken-for-granted behavior patterns and fundamental psychological variables universal to such groups.
  
  • PSYC 634 - Addictive Behaviors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    This course includes the study of assessment, diagnosis, and clinical practice of addictive behaviors. Empirically supported treatment modalities are presented with an emphasis on Motivational Interviewing. Approaches for working with specific substances and special populations are presented.
  
  • PSYC 636 - Abnormal Behaviors


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Development of knowledge and skill in observing, communicating, classifying, and interpreting normal and abnormal human behavior. Prerequisite: Admittance into graduate program.
  
  • PSYC 641 - Behavioral Medicine


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    The study of psychological factors that influence physical health and illness and the application of behavioral principles to the prevention and treatment of illness and the promotion of health.
  
  • PSYC 642 - Cognitive Assessment: Intelligence, Memory, and Achievement


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An advanced study of the theory, principles, and practice of cognitive assessment. Substantial experience in administration, scoring, interpretation, and report-writing for the most commonly used cognitive assessment tools. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.
  
  • PSYC 643 - Personnel Assessment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    An overview of the role of assessment in industrial settings. Topics include need assessment, job analysis, personnel selection, interviewing, test selection, test reliability and validity, performance appraisal, ethical and legal issues in assessment, and interpretation of selected tests in employment settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 660 , admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 644 - Child, Adolescent, and Family Therapy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Surveys psychotherapeutic approaches and techniques for child and adolescent problems. Survey conducted within a strong developmental and familial framework. Emphasizes empirically supported psychotherapeutic programs for specific disorder presentations and conceptual skills necessary for effectively intervening with children, adolescents, and their parents. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 645 - Child and Adolescent Assessment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Advanced training in the use of psychological assessment instruments for the evaluation of children and adolescents experiencing emotional, behavioral, or academic problems. Preparation of evaluations, recommendations, and report writing for presentation of information to family and professionals is emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.
  
  • PSYC 646 - Lifespan Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Overview of conceptual, theoretical, and methodological issues in the study of human development across the lifespan. Topics include social, emotional, biological, cognitive, and moral development from the prenatal to old age phases of life.
  
  • PSYC 647 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Overview of conceptual and diagnostic issues in understanding children and adolescents who experience emotional and behavioral disorders. Emphasis on the development of diagnostic skills using the DSM and associated assessment strategies in clinical and school settings. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 648 - Advanced Psychotherapeutic Techniques


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Intense exposure to at least three currently-practiced techniques of psychotherapy. Discussion of theory, practice and research; demonstrations and observed student practice. Prerequisite: PSYC 610  admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 649 - Behavioral Interventions


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Provides students with the knowledge and comprehension of the principles and procedures of behavior modification. In addition, the students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and modify inappropriate behaviors and evaluate intervention programs. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 650 - Ethics and Issues in Professional Psychology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An overview of the ethical and professional issues in applied psychological fields. Topics addressed include credentialing, ethical standards, legal considerations, professional development, and the role of personal beliefs and values in professional practice.
  
  • PSYC 657 - Multivariate Statistics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An introduction to such topics as statistical inferences, sampling techniques, hypothesis testing, design of experiments, analysis of variance, special correlation methods, multiple prediction, and errors of measurement.
  
  • PSYC 660 - Clinical Assessment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Theoretical issues and research in clinical assessment with special reference to administration and interpretation of testing procedures and clinical interviewing. Specific training with various methods of personality testing, behavioral assessment, and interviewing techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.
  
  • PSYC 664 - Theory and Practice of Career Counseling


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A study of social, economic, and occupational information as related to helping relationships. It is designed to acquaint the student with the essential nature of such information in career decision making, job analysis, and its use in career counseling. Prerequisite: PSYC 610 , PSYC 660 , admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.
  
  • PSYC 665 - Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Survey of influential theories of counseling and psychotherapy with emphasis on their implications for contemporary research and practice.
  
  • PSYC 668 - Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Develops a knowledge base in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and the conceptualization of human behavior (emotions, cognition, and executive systems) in a neurobiological context.
  
  • PSYC 669 - Human Learning and Cognition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, odd years

    An overview of information processing theory as applied to human learning and cognition with application to assessment and intervention with individuals with disordered cognition.
  
  • PSYC 670 - Introduction to Neuropsychological Assessment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Theory, research and practice related to the behavioral expression of brain dysfunction. Overview of selected neuropsychological instruments in current use and their clinical applications. Emphasis on a functional, hypothesis-testing approach and the integration of case history and test data to determine diagnostic indications and remedial prescriptions. Testing fee required.
  
  • PSYC 676 - Prevention, Intervention, and Advocacy in School Psychology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Examines in a seminar setting specific issues that are involved in the practice of school psychology, specifically in the areas of prevention, intervention, and advocacy. Students will acquire familiarity with a broad range of techniques and gain competency in those techniques of particular relevance to their career goals. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 681 - Mental Health in the Workplace


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    A review of abnormal psychology within the employment setting. The history and definitions of abnormal behavior, major theoretical models of abnormality, and the classification and assessment of mental disorders will be covered. Organizational context issues related to the evaluation of mental health problems will also be studied.
  
  • PSYC 682 - Advanced Psychopathology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Review of theoretical and empirical literature definitions and systems of classifying deviant behavior patterns. Coverage of specific areas of pathology including situational reactions, emotional disorders, characterological disorders, substance abuse, chronic disorders, and family dysfunction. Instruction in purpose and use of contemporary diagnostic systems including the DSM.
  
  • PSYC 683 - School Consultation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Focuses on understanding family dynamics and communicating and collaborating effectively with parents and other professionals in the educational environment. Emphasizes training in problem identification and problem solving, consensus building, conflict resolution, consultation and effective communication skills in the context of educating exceptional children.
  
  • PSYC 685 - Issues in Education of Exceptional Children


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Summer

    Studies current trends and issues in the legal, financial and administrative aspects of special education. Emphasis given to professional organizations and resources for teaching children with special learning needs.
  
  • PSYC 688 - Teams and Team Leadership


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Analysis of the factors contributing to success of teams in complex organizations, focusing on team selection, development, training, and evaluation. Students will develop skills through team-building and leading in simulations and team projects.
  
  • PSYC 690 - Practicum I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Brings the student into a face-to-face relationship with a client under the supervision of the course instructor. Audio and visual devices will be used for supervision and observation by other students. A minimum of 160 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Prerequisite: PSYC 610 , and consent of graduate advisor, admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 692 - Practicum II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Supervised practice in clinical psychology, including interviewing, assessment, therapy, report writing and staff participation. A variety of practicum settings is available. A minimum of 160 clock hours of supervised experience required. May be repeated. Prerequisite: PSYC 610 , PSYC 648 , PSYC 650 , PSYC 660 , PSYC 690 , admission to a graduate psychology program required.
  
  • PSYC 694 - Practicum III


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Supervised practice in psychology, including professional activities in clinical, counseling, school or industrial psychology. A variety of practicum settings are available. A minimum of 160 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Prerequisite: PSYC 645 , PSYC 647 , PSYC 649 , PSYC 690 .
  
  • PSYC 695 - School Psychology Internship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, spring

    The opportunity to demonstrate, under conditions of appropriate supervision, the application of knowledge, development of skills for effective school psychological service delivery, and integration of competencies addressing professional preparation and practice. A minimum of 1200 clock hours required, with 600 in the public school setting. Prerequisite: Completion of all required course work for the specialist degree in School Psychology including: PSYC 608 , PSYC 612 , PSYC 624 , PSYC 642 , PSYC 644 , PSYC 645 , PSYC 646 , PSYC 647 , PSYC 649 , PSYC 657 , PSYC 668 , PSYC 669 , PSYC 676 , PSYC 690 , PSYC 694 , SPED 677 , PSYC 683 , PSYC 685 .
  
  • PSYC 699 - Master’s Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6
    This course is available for variable credit. Please see your advisor for more information.

Reading

  
  • READ 322 - Reading in Secondary Content Areas


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Designed to analyze reading skills involved in secondary content areas, including techniques of teaching study skills, improving comprehension, and vocabulary growth. Prerequisite: EDUC 211  and EDUC 221 . Junior standing. Admission to Teacher Education Program required.
  
  • READ 363 - Foundations of Reading


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Introduces current reading theory, practice, and approaches in developmental reading, age 3 through grade 12. Prerequisite: EDUC 211 , EDUC 250 , and EACH 363 . Admission to Teacher Education Program required.
  
  • READ 460 - Reading Assessment and Instruction


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A field-based course emphasizing informal and observational assessment approaches to correction of reading problems, age 3 through grade 12. Prerequisite: EDUC 211 , EDUC 331 ; READ 363 . Admission to Teacher Education Program required.
  
  • READ 464 - Reading-Writing Connection


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A study of the related language arts taught in the elementary school. Prerequisite: EDUC 211 , EDUC 250 , EDUC 331  and READ 363 . Admission to Teacher Education Program required.
  
  • READ 480 - Problems in Reading


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Field-based application of reading instruction and assessment methods. Course emphasizes data-driven decision making and differentiated instruction in reading. Prerequisite: EDUC 331  and READ 363 . Admission to Teacher Education Program required.
  
  • READ 614 - Foundations of Reading


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    This course introduces theoretical perspectives that inform the teaching of reading; current reading research practices; and approaches in the teaching of reading in early childhood through grade 12 along with the strategies and skills necessary for the implementation of a comprehensive and balanced literacy program.
  
  • READ 617 - Reading Assessment and Instruction


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    A course designed to teach students how to administer a variety of reading assessments, analyze the data generated, and apply instructional strategies to address children’s strengths and needs in a reading clinic setting.

Sociology

  
  • SOCI 111 - Introduction to Sociology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    An introduction to sociology as a social science. Basic concepts and principles of the discipline are employed in fulfilling the influence of culture and social interaction on social behavior. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • SOCI 222 - Social Problems


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Application of sociological concepts and methods of analysis to selected current social problems such as overpopulation, poverty, race and ethnic relations, the family, crime and delinquency, mental disorders, drug abuse, and suicide. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • SOCI 350 - Sociology of Aging


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An overview of the research and literature related to the demographic, social, and cultural aspects of aging in the United States and in other cultures. Same as GERO 350 /GERO 550 .
  
  • SOCI 355 - Social Deviance


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    A theoretical and descriptive analysis of socially deviant behavior and the social interactive process in its definition and control. Same as POLC 355 .
  
  • SOCI 368 - Sociology of the Family


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    This course is designed to provide an understanding of contemporary courtship, marriage, and family interaction as cultural, social, and social-psychological phenomena. With special consideration of the major sources of marital strain and conflict within a heterogeneous, rapidly changing society.
  
  • SOCI 380 - Urban and Community Studies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    The nature, processes, and trends of urbanization and their impact upon the social systems, the family, and the individual. Special emphasis on U.S. cities and related research.
  
  • SOCI 385 - Social Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Overview of major sociological theories and theorists including an examination of the application of sociological theory to contemporary social thought and policy making. An introduction to the method of theory construction. Prerequisite: SOCI 111 . A writing-intensive course.
  
  • SOCI 388 - Crime and Delinquency


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An overview of the extent, trend, and types of criminal and delinquent behavior as well as research findings and theories associated with it.
  
  • SOCI 415 - Social Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    An application of the scientific method to the study of social phenomena; consideration of basic methods of data gathering, analysis and reporting, including basic statistics. Students experience organizing, conducting, and evaluating research. A writing-intensive course.
  
  • SOCI 416 - Social Statistics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An introduction to computer-assisted statistical analysis of social data, with the emphasis on nonparametric concepts and applications. Prerequisite: Junior standing or approval of the instructor.
  
  • SOCI 438 - Political Sociology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, odd years

    A survey of the field of political sociology, including: the nature and roles of power, influence, and authority; citizenship, nationalism, the state and nation; the sociology of law; class, the power elite, and political economy; transnational processes, imperialism, and hegemony; social movements and social change; and gender, race, culture, and identity in politics. The course aims to critically survey the dominant theories in the field and is directed at critically engaging the world around us.
  
  • SOCI 442 - Cultural Diversity


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    A study of American minority relations including facts and myths, sources and consequences of prejudice, and patterns of intergroup relations. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • SOCI 460 - Ethics and Social Issues


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An attempt to help students reach a higher critical and reflective consciousness of the relationship of ethics to professional and business decision making and problem solving. Same as GERO 460 /GERO 560 .
  
  • SOCI 477 - Sociology of Religion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, alternating years

    Explores social scientific efforts to study and analyze religion, social origins and influence of religion, religion’s influence on society, and contemporary social forces impacting on religion’s trends and the future of religion. Emphasis is placed on U.S. religions.
  
  • SOCI 480 - Inequality and Social Justice


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, alternating years

    Explores the relationship between social inequality and social justice focusing on several interrelated issues including income inequality, wealth inequality, race and ethnic inequality, gender inequality, and political inequality. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
  • SOCI 495 - Sociology Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Designed as a capstone experience for senior sociology majors focusing on methodological, theoretical, and substantive issues of interest in the field. Must be taken during the last semester of the senior year or with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: SOCI 385 , SOCI 415 , SOCI 416 . A capstone course.
  
  • SOCI 498 - Sociological Practice I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A supervised on-the-job learning experience within an approved work setting relevant to academic and career goals and designed to provide constructive sociological assistance to community organizations.
  
  • SOCI 516 - Social Statistics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An introduction to computer-assisted statistical analysis of social data, with the emphasis on nonparametric concepts and applications. Prerequisite: Junior standing or approval of the instructor.
  
  • SOCI 542 - Cultural Diversity


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A study of American minority relations including facts and myths, sources and consequences of prejudice, and patterns of intergroup relations.
  
  • SOCI 550 - Sociology of Aging


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An overview of the research and literature related to the demographic, social, and cultural aspects of aging in the United States and in other cultures. Same as GERO 350 /GERO 550 .
  
  • SOCI 560 - Ethics and Social Issues


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An attempt to help students reach a higher critical and reflective consciousness of the relationship of ethics to professional and business decision making and problem solving. Same as GERO 460 /GERO 560 .
  
  • SOCI 568 - Sociology of the Family


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years.

    This course is designed to provide an understanding of contemporary courtship, marriage, and family interaction as cultural, social, and socialpsychological phenomena. With special consideration of the major sources of marital strain and conflict within a heterogeneous, rapidly changing society.
  
  • SOCI 577 - Sociology of Religion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Explores social scientific efforts to study and analyze religion, social origins and influence of religion, religion’s influence on society, and contemporary social forces impacting on religion’s trends and the future of religion. Emphasis is placed on U.S. religions.
  
  • SOCI 580 - Inequality and Social Justice


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    Explores the relationship between social inequality and social justice focusing on several interrelated issues including income inequality, wealth inequality, race and ethnic inequality, gender inequality, and political inequality.
  
  • SOCI 615 - Social Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An application of the scientific method to the study of social phenomena; consideration of basic methods of data gathering, analysis and reporting, including basic statistics. Students experience organizing, conducting and evaluating research. Same as GERO 615 .

Social Work

  
  • SOCW 230 - Introduction to Social Work


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Introduction to the field of social welfare, including the history and current structures of social welfare policy and services in the U.S. The social work profession is presented and major fields of practice are identified.
  
  • SOCW 250 - Person to Person: The Fundamental Skills of Relating


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    An exploration of relationship skills and social work values needed for practice. Emphasis is placed on student experience in expanding personal skill areas. Principles of interviewing are introduced.
  
  • SOCW 327 - Micro/Mezzo Human Behavior Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An examination of the biopsychosocial factors that shape human experience; attention is given to the impact of mezzo and micro systems, including families and individuals. Additional emphasis is given to diversity in these systems and within and among various groups. Special attention is given to the role of social, cultural, and spiritual development across the life span.
  
  • SOCW 329 - Diversity, Power, and Oppression


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A foundation for the understanding of the nature, character and consequences of being excluded from available opportunities and services. Although institutional racism and sexism are the main thrust, the course also explores the implications of discrimination for other special populations, including ethnic groups, older persons, and the disabled. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • SOCW 351 - Social Work Practice with Micro Systems


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Principles of social work practice; knowledge, values, and skills demanded of the social work professional in working with micro systems. Laboratory graded and credited with the course. Prerequisite: Admission to the social work program or permission of the director.
  
  • SOCW 381 - Field Practicum I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 5
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Experience in a social service agency applying knowledge and theory and developing practice skills for a beginning level social work practitioner. Students complete 200 clock hours under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor and attend field seminar class weekly. Course fee.
  
  • SOCW 415 - Social Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Social Work practice-focused quantitative and qualitative research knowledge and skills. Includes critical evaluation of empirical literature and basic research methodology including construct operationalization; study design; selection, development, implementation, and evaluation of measures and instruments. Prerequisite: Admission to the social work program or permission of the director.
  
  • SOCW 416 - Program and Practice Evaluation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Covers analysis of the strengths/limitations of needs assessment and program evaluation methods; the analysis and management of program data using statistical software; and the measurement of program goals/objectives through process and outcome evaluations. With an emphasis on critical thinking and evidence-based practice, students will utilize these skills to perform evaluations in their areas of interest. Prerequisite: SOCW 415 . A capstone course.
  
  • SOCW 441 - Social Welfare Policy and Services


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A descriptive and analytical study of social welfare programs and policies; examination of the relationship between social work and other aspects of the U.S. social welfare system noting overall impact on service delivery. Same as GERO 441 .
  
  • SOCW 442 - Policy Analysis and Practice


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An examination of the political and ideological factors of policy development, implementation and evaluation. An analysis of the elements that affect the intended and unintended outcomes of policy implementation and explores criteria for evaluating the attainment of policy goals and objectives. Emphasis on policy practice and political advocacy. Prerequisite: SOCW 351  and SOCW 441 .
  
  • SOCW 451 - Social Work Practice with Macro Systems


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Principles of social work practice; knowledge, values, and skills demanded of the social work professional in working with mezzo and macro systems. Laboratory graded and credited with the course. Prerequisite: SOCW 351 . A writing-intensive course.
  
  • SOCW 481 - Field Practicum II


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 5
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Continued experience in the same social service agency applying knowledge and theory and developing practice skills for a beginning level social work practitioner. Students complete 250 clock hours under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor and attend a field seminar class weekly. Prerequisite: SOCW 381 . Corequisite: SOCW 416 . A capstone course. Course fee.
  
  • SOCW 615 - Social Work Research Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Social Work practice-focused quantitative and qualitative research knowledge and skills. Includes critical evaluation of empirical literature and basic research methodology including construct operationalization; study design; selection, development, implementation, and evaluation of measures and instruments.
  
  • SOCW 616 - Program and Practice Evaluation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Covers analysis of the strengths/limitations of needs assessment and program evaluation methods; the analysis and management of program data using statistical software; and the measurement of program goals/objectives through process and outcome evaluations. With an emphasis on critical thinking and evidence-based practice, students will utilize these skills to perform evaluations in their areas of interest. Prerequisite: SOCW 615 .
  
  • SOCW 625 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An examination of the biopsychosocial factors that shape human experience. Social, cultural and spiritual developments across the life span are emphasized.
  
  • SOCW 626 - Diversity, Power and Oppression


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A foundation for the understanding of the nature, character and consequences of exclusion of marginalized populations. Although institutional racism and sexism are the main thrust, the course also explores the implications of discrimination for other special populations, including ethnic groups, older persons, and the disabled. Prerequisite: SOCW 625 .
  
  • SOCW 641 - Social Welfare Policy and Services


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Provides a historical overview of the development of social welfare policies and the profession of social work. The course also prepares students to analyze social problems systematically and to gain understanding of the social welfare system in the U.S.
  
  • SOCW 642 - Policy Analysis and Practice


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    The development, implementation and evaluation of social welfare policy, with special attention to social policies that affect disadvantaged and oppressed groups in society. The role of the economy, politics and culture in policy development and implementation are also examined. Prerequisite: SOCW 641 .
  
  • SOCW 651 - Foundations of Evidence-Based Social Work Practice I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Foundations of evidence-based practice with individuals, families, organizations and communities within a framework of core social work values and practice obligations. Situations are viewed from an ecological perspective, targeting for change all client and community systems that are contributing to client problems. Corequisite: SOCW 681 .
  
  • SOCW 652 - Foundations of Evidence-Based Social Work Practice II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A continuation of SOCW 651 . Corequisite: SOCW 682 .
  
  • SOCW 681 - Foundation Field Practicum I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Experience in a social service agency applying generalist knowledge and theory and developing practice skills for a beginning level social work practitioner. Students complete 200 clock hours under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor and attend a field seminar class weekly. Corequisite: SOCW 651 . Course fee.
  
  • SOCW 682 - Foundation Field Practicum II


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Continued experience in the same social service agency applying generalist knowledge and theory and developing practice skills for a beginning level social work practitioner. Students complete 200 clock hours under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor and attend a field seminar class weekly. Corequisite: SOCW 652 . Course fee.
  
  • SOCW 690 - Social Services Internship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6
    This course is available for variable credit. Please see your advisor for more information.
 

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