2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II 
    
    Jun 20, 2024  
2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The information following course titles indicate (1) hours per week of lecture, (2) hours per week of laboratory and (3) semester credit hours. A small number of courses are offered for a variable number of credit hours, and the semester credit hours listed represent the maximum number of hours possible for credit. This will be noted in the course description.

The frequency of offering follows the meeting and credit hour information. Courses offered every year are designated by semester(s) only. Courses offered every other year are designated by semester and odd/even year.

Note: Since most courses are not offered every semester, students should be aware that failure to take a required course when it is offered may delay graduation.

Any course may be offered on demand should sufficient interest be demonstrated and should a qualified instructor be available. “Demand” courses with a defined content will be offered as regularly as practical for the host department.

At the end of the course description, the following information will be given when applicable: laboratory information, corequisites (“simultaneous enrollment”) and prerequisites, cross listed courses (“same as”), special fees, and pertinent information about the use of the course.

Courses and Numbering

All courses are listed alphabetically by course prefix and numerically within each prefix. The department and college assignments are also noted. ACU uses a three-digit course numbering system. Courses numbered 100 to 299 are lower-level courses (primarily for freshmen and sophomores). Courses numbered from 300 to 499 are upper-level, or advanced, courses (primarily for juniors and seniors). Courses numbered 500 to 799 are graduate courses. All courses numbered 000 to 099 do not count toward graduation or GPA.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Some courses have prerequisites, which must be met before a student may register for that course, or corequisites, which must be completed simultaneously. In some cases, a student may have special knowledge, skills or background that will enable him or her to perform well in a given class without meeting its prerequisites or corequisites. Such a student should seek special permission from the department offering the course.

A course may not use the same requirement as both prerequisite and corequisite. Courses listed as corequisite must be taken together. Students may not drop or withdraw from a course with corequisite requirements without dropping or withdrawing from both courses. Students may repeat a course with corequisite requirements alone in subsequent attempts if they fail or do not receive degree credit for the course on the first attempt. However, in courses with a subject code of EACH, EDUC, NURS, or SPAN, students must repeat both corequisite courses if they fail or do not receive credit for one or both courses on the first attempt.

Students should refer to the most recent catalog for course corequisites, prerequisites, and restrictions.

Course Sequencing

Some courses have recommendations of a previous course(s) for appropriate sequencing. Such recommendations are not prerequisites; the system will allow any student meeting a course’s prerequisites to enroll for a course regardless of whether the student meets the sequencing recommendations. Students are cautioned, however, to follow sequencing recommendations when all of the courses in the sequence are on their degree plans.

Independent Study and Special Topics Courses

Neither an independent study nor a special topics course should be a version or instance of a course that already has been approved for inclusion in the catalog.

Independent Study

An independent study course is a unique, student-initiated and student-driven course. An independent study course should be used to enhance a degree. It should be used as a substitution for degree requirements only in rare circumstances; it should not be used to correct poor planning. All other catalog policies apply.

Independent study courses are usually designed to be worth 3 credit hours. Ideally, independent study courses should make up no more than 6 hours (5 percent) of any student’s undergraduate degree. They should make up no more than 20 percent of any student’s graduate degree. Independent study courses should use the even hundred course number appropriate to the level of study (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, etc.)

Student proposals for independent studies may be approved or denied based on faculty interest or availability and departmental priorities. Students in the Doctor of Ministry (DMin) program will incur a separate fee for an independent study course and should contact the Director of the DMin Program for details.

When proposing an independent study, the student should complete the Independent Study Request form and discuss it – including the outcomes and artifacts of the study – with the proposed faculty member. Artifacts should support the student’s and the faculty member’s intended outcomes for the course through research, written work, creative projects, and/or professional projects. If the course is approved by the faculty member, the faculty member is responsible for creating the syllabus for the independent study. The syllabus must include the learning outcomes and how they will be measured.

The syllabus and Independent Study Request form should be submitted to the chair and dean on a timeline that would allow for the proposal to be approved or denied prior to the beginning of the term or part of term in which the course is being proposed. Study Abroad courses should be approved prior to departure from the United States.

Special topics

A special topics course is faculty/department-initiated and faculty-driven. A special topics course will be included in the course schedule for registration in a given term and could be used as a pilot for addition to the curriculum. A substitution form must be submitted for a special topics course to satisfy degree requirement. All other catalog policies apply.

The special topics syllabus must be submitted to the dean before March 1 for a fall course or October 1 for a spring or summer course, so that it will be available for student registration. Special topics courses should choose the course number appropriate to the level of study from the following: 140, 240, 340, 440, 540, 640, 740, etc.

The Texas Common Course Numbering System

The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) has been designed for the purpose of aiding students in the transfer of general academic courses between colleges and universities throughout Texas. Common courses are freshman and sophomore academic credit courses that have been identified as common by institutions that are members of the common course numbering system. The system ensures that if the student takes the courses the receiving institution designates as common, then the courses will be accepted in transfer.

For further information contact the transfer course coordinator in the Registrar’s Office.

 

Chemistry and Biochemistry

  
  • CHEM 113 - Introductory Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Fundamental concepts of atomic structure; chemical reactions of acids, bases, and salts; behavior of solids, liquids, and gases; and solutions are presented to students of nursing and agriculture. Can be credited without CHEM 111 . Prerequisite: ACT math score of 21 or above; or MATH SAT (prior to March 1, 2016) score of 550 or above; or MATH SAT (after March 1, 2016) score of 570 or above; or credit for MATH 120  or above. Not for majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • CHEM 114 - Introductory Organic and Biological Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Continuation of CHEM 113 . Study of organic compounds of carbon: hydrocarbons and those functional groups of importance to living systems. Biochemistry of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Can be credited without CHEM 112 . Prerequisite: CHEM 113 . Not for majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • CHEM 131 - General Chemistry Laboratory I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Standard laboratory equipment is used to collect and interpret data. Experiments include determination of molecular formula, solution concentration and chemical reactivity. Corequisite: CHEM 133 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 132 - General Chemistry Laboratory II


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Continues to explore practical application of chemistry. Spectrophotometers and pH meters are used to study chemical equilibrium. Qualitative analysis is also introduced. Corequisite: CHEM 134 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 133 - General Chemistry I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Fundamental principles of chemistry including the structure of matter, stoichiometry, periodicity, bonding, and reactivity. Prerequisite: MATH 109  or MATW 109  with minimum grade of “C”, or MATH 124 , or MATH 185 , or mathematics placement testing into MATH 124  or MATH 185 . Corequisite: CHEM 131 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • CHEM 134 - General Chemistry II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Continues with basic chemical concepts including thermodynamics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CHEM 133  (or credit by exam). Corequisite: CHEM 132 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • CHEM 203 - General Science for Elementary Teachers


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Presents the fundamental principles of chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, meteorology, and biology on a practical basis for elementary teachers. The course includes experiments and demonstrations that are pertinent to the teaching of science at the elementary level. For education majors only. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 221 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, most Summers

    Emphasizes separation and synthesis: techniques of recrystallization, distillation, solvent extraction, organic preparation, separation of mixtures by gas vapor chromatography, and polarimetry. Corequisite: CHEM 223 . Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 223 - Organic Chemistry I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, most Summers

    Presents the structure, nomenclature, and properties of alkanes, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds, alcohols, ethers, alkenes, and alkynes. Includes chemical bonding, resonance, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CHEM 134 . Corequisite: CHEM 221 .
  
  • CHEM 243 - Elementary Biochemistry and Nutrition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A more extensive coverage of the chemistry and metabolic pathways of biologically important molecules (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) with emphasis on nutrition. Prerequisite: CHEM 114 . Not for majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
  
  • CHEM 308 - Global Healthcare


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer, even years

    A study of healthcare delivery systems, quality of healthcare, and the impact of socioeconomic factors and culture on the delivery of healthcare through readings, discussion and interviews. Field experience will be gained through service-learning activities and observation within a medical community. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Corequisite: Participation in required shadowing, observation, and service components. Same as BIOL 308 , CSD 308 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • CHEM 322 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring, most Summers

    Follows with synthesis and analysis: organic synthesis and the systematic identification of unknown organic compounds by using the classical scheme of organic qualitative analysis and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis. Corequisite: CHEM 324 . Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 324 - Organic Chemistry II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, most Summers

    Continues with the structure, nomenclature, and properties of benzene, substituted benzenes, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, derivatives of carboxylic acids, amines. Includes spectroscopy and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CHEM 223 .
  
  • CHEM 333 - Physical Chemistry I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    Thermodynamics and its application to systems at equilibrium, including chemical and phase equilibrium, solutions and colligative properties, ideal and real gases, and others. Prerequisite: CHEM 324 ; MATH 186  or simultaneous enrollment; PHYS 112  or PHYS 222 . Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 334 - Physical Chemistry II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Spring, odd years

    Kinetic-molecular theory, transport processes such as diffusion and viscosity, rates of reactions (chemical kinetics), quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: CHEM 333 or consent of instructor. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 341 - Environmental Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: on demand

    The chemical materials, reactions, and processes associated with air, water, and soil pollution, including effects on human, animal, and plant health. Topics include stratospheric ozone, global warming, acid rain, smog, indoor air pollutants, organic and inorganic water and soil contaminants, soil and water pH, effects of energy production, and others. Prerequisite: CHEM 322, 324.
  
  • CHEM 355 - Analytical Chemistry I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Emphasizes the basic theoretical principles, calculations and methods of electrochemical and volumetric analyses and various analytical separation methods. Laboratory involves neutralization and oxidation-reduction titrations, potentiometry, electrogravimetry, cyclic voltammetry and use of gas, column, thin layer, and high performance liquid chromatography to analyze chemical samples. Laboratory graded and credited with the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 322, 324. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 356 - Analytical Chemistry II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Integrated lecture/laboratory course emphasizing qualitative and quantitative analyses based on light, including UV-visible absorption, atomic absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence, and plasma emission methods and the use of mass spectrometry, multi-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy in the elucidation of structures for chemical compounds. Laboratory graded and credited with the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 322, 324. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 375 - Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An introduction to molecular modeling of organic, inorganic, and biologically important molecules using desktop computers. Includes building and animating 3-D models, energy minimization, molecular dynamics, docking and overlaying, analysis of symmetry and bonding in molecules and crystals, and prediction of reactivity. Prerequisite: CHEM 324 .
  
  • CHEM 393 - Introduction to Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 9
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Students carry out an experimental investigation related to the research interest of a faculty member for 1-3 credit hours. A paper incorporating results of the research work, written in the format of published journal articles, is required for completion of the course. This course is available for variable credit. Please see your advisor for more information. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  
  • CHEM 401 - Secondary Science Teaching Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A study of teaching strategies and curriculum development for the secondary sciences. Presents the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, College and Career Readiness Standards, and classroom management and discipline for the science laboratory environment. Prerequisite: 16 hours of science from appropriate secondary science teaching degree plan. Corequisite: EDUC 412  and EDUC 432 . Should be taken before student teaching. Same as BIOL 401 , PHYS 401 .
  
  • CHEM 413 - Physical Chemistry/Life Sciences


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Introduces the fundamentals of physical chemistry applied to biological systems. Includes thermodynamics, bioenergetics, chemical equilibria, kinetics, enzyme catalysis and inhibition of living systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 324 ; MATH 124  or higher.
  
  • CHEM 423 - Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Use of the chemical literature, both paper and electronic, as well as student presentations of one or more seminars to improve technical communication skills. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. For majors only. A capstone and writing-intensive course.
  
  • CHEM 441 - Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    Techniques and methods for synthesizing and characterizing inorganic compounds. Also introduces crystal structure and crystal growth. Corequisite: CHEM 443 . Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 443 - Inorganic Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    Covers the chemistry of all elements with special attention given to transition metals. Molecular structure and bonding are described in detail. May be credited without CHEM 441  with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: CHEM 324 ; MATH 124  or higher.
  
  • CHEM 453 - Biochemistry I: Foundations of Biochemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Discusses the chemistry, structural aspects, and properties of amino acids, peptides, proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CHEM 324 . Same as BIOL 472 .
  
  • CHEM 454 - Biochemistry II: Gene Expression


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Presents biochemistry of signal transduction and prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CHEM 453 .
  
  • CHEM 456 - Biochemistry III: Metabolism


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Presents the biochemistry of metabolic pathways with an emphasis on integration and regulation. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CHEM 453  or BIOL 472 .
  
  • CHEM 463 - Biochemistry Laboratory I


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Practical experience and theoretical background in general biochemistry laboratory techniques and techniques for the analysis of protein structure and function. Prerequisite: CHEM 453  or simultaneous enrollment. Course fee.
  
  • CHEM 464 - Biochemistry Laboratory II


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Practical experience and theoretical background in general biochemistry laboratory techniques, enzyme purification and analysis and in recombinant DNA analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 453  and CHEM 463 .
  
  • CHEM 483 - Polymer Chemistry


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Credit Hours: 4
    Terms Offered: On demand

    Presents fundamental chemical study of the structure and properties of the general classes of high polymers, including synthesis and mechanism of formation. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. Course fee.

Contemporary Music Center

  
  • CMUS 4M0 - Faith, Music and Culture


    Credit Hours: 3
    This course will help students rethink what it means to be a Christian, a musician and a Christian musician. Six films are shown, each revealing an important but often neglected area of struggle within the life of an artist. Students are then challenged to re-examine their belief systems in God and themselves and reconcile their career ambitions with God’s purpose for their lives.
  
  • CMUS 4M1 - Inside the Music Industry


    Credit Hours: 3
    This course provides an overview of the music industry, focusing on the six more important contracts negotiated by artists and executives; artist management, recording label, publishing, concert rider, licensing, and copyright. Emphasis is given to career possibilities and the gifts and skills required to succeed in each of the major areas.
  
  • CMUS 4M10 - Audio Engineering


    Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on concepts and common practices in professional audio. Instruction and practical experience will focus on sound reinforcement for concerts as well as recording studio techniques, since both disciplines employ the same concepts. The information learned in this course will be put into practice in both the Concert Production and Studio Production courses. (Possible Credits: Audio Fundamentals, Music Technology, Survey of Production, Audio Editing Techniques, Advanced Engineering, Survey of Recording Technology, Survey of Recording Industry, Mixing Techniques, Digital Audio Technology)
  
  • CMUS 4M11 - Concert Production


    Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on sound reinforcement, stage lighting and design, stage management, and concert production management. The concepts and practices learned in this course will be used by the students to produce the weekly CMC Live show in support of the Artist Track student performances, as well as the week long tour of CCCU college campuses. The goal is for students to leave the CMC prepared for an entry level position in any area of concert production. (Possible Credits: Sound Reinforcement, Concert/Stage Lighting, Survey of Video Production, Production Management, Stage Management, Lab Credit, Tour Credit, Senior Project Credit, Practicum)
  
  • CMUS 4M2 - Supervised Practicum


    Credit Hours: 1
    Each student will participate in a road trip practicum. Briefings, tours, meetings and internships will be arranged with leading record companies, artist management firms, booking agencies, recording studios, concert promoters, writers, producers and artists.
  
  • CMUS 4M3 - Essentials of Song Writing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Students are required to write a minimum of ten original songs during the semester. The first eight songs have carefully defined parameters which, while allowing students to write within their favorite genre, force them to write outside of their comfort zone. Emphasis is placed on the song as the vehicle for creativity and public communication.
  
  • CMUS 4M4 - Studio Recording


    Credit Hours: 3
    This course introduces students to the concept of non-linear, non-destructive editing within the digital domain. Pro Tools TDM, 001 & Mbox are used by students to assemble and record a minimum of three finished master-quality recordings. All students will acquire enough experience to record, mix and master their own tracks for demo purposes.
  
  • CMUS 4M5 - Performance


    Credit Hours: 3
    During the first three nights of the first full week, each student is required to perform two songs, solo. Pre-recorded tracks or other student players are allowed to assist those students who do not play an instrument. As each student defines their musical style and public persona, additional concert appearances are required.
  
  • CMUS 4M6 - Strategic Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Business Track students will assemble a successful artist roster and participate in the following activities on their artist’s behalf: scheduling, creating a business plan, analyzing and forecasting trends in popular music, advising and developing the artists with regard to their live show and recordings. (Possible Credit: Business Administration, Management, Marketing, Communications and/or Media)
  
  • CMUS 4M7 - Music Business Survey


    Credit Hours: 3
    Through lecture, text and visiting music industry experts, Business Track students will gain a broad understanding of key aspects of the music business including: Booking, Artist Management, Touring, Road Management, Production, Marketing and Promotion, Copyright and Legal Issues, Publishing and Licensing. This course will outline economic, creative and spiritual elements critical to a career in contemporary music and guide students in assessing their own strengths, weaknesses and interests. The focus for this course is hands-on application through work with contracts, live show production and career planning. (Possible Credit: Business Administration, Management, Marketing, Communications and/or Media)
  
  • CMUS 4M8 - Advanced Media Marketing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Through classroom instruction and presentations by visiting industry experts, Business Track students will become familiar with traditional and progressive marketing strategies. Key areas including publicity, advertising, radio and video promotion, Internet marketing, and tour support will be addressed. Students will develop a comprehensive marketing plan for each Artist and will also create and implement the marketing plan for the CMC Tour. (Possible Credit: Business Administration, Management, Marketing, Communications and/or Media)
  
  • CMUS 4M9 - Advanced Studio Recording


    Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on professional audio recording and production. The concepts and practices learned in this course will be used by the students to engineer and mix three songs per student in the Artist Track. The goal is for students to leave the CMC prepared for an entry level position in any area of studio recording. (Possible Credits: Recording Techniques, Music Technology, Studio Production, Audio Post-Production, Advanced Pro Tools Techniques, MIDI Sequencing, Lab Credit, Senior Project Credit, Practicum)

Communication

  
  • COMM 101 - Introduction to Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course provides a survey of the terminology, methods, theories, and topics within the discipline of communication. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • COMM 136 - Debate Workshop


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Students will study the current national debate questions and will prepare for intramural and intercollegiate debating. Requires three hours per week and may be repeated for six semester hours maximum credit.
  
  • COMM 211 - Speech and Rhetoric


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Develops public speaking knowledge, skills, and attitudes through the interaction of rhetorical theory, practice, and analysis. Prerequisite: ENGL 111 , ENGL 112 . May be used to satisfy University Requirements. Course fee.
  
  • COMM 230 - Interview Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Theory and practice of communication strategies in the interview process. Class experiences include formal (employment, appraisal) and informal (informing, persuading) interview activities.
  
  • COMM 231 - Small Group Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Training in the principles and practices of small group communication including practice with learning situations and problem-solving situations. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • COMM 236 - General Communication Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Introduces students to the essential features of current communication theories dealing with interpersonal, organizational, small group, public, intercultural, and gender, to establish a framework that will provide a context for each theory and show interrelationships among them.
  
  • COMM 241 - Interpersonal Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Skills and theory of interpersonal relationships, including marriage, family, and work. Deals with communication variables that influence dyads. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • COMM 291 - Survey Research Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course is designed to provide students with skills necessary to conceptualize, operationalize, analyze, and report basic survey research.
  
  • COMM 310 - Civil Discourse


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Focuses on the need for civil conversations over difficult topics, the inner dispositions necessary for meaningful engagement, and the practical skills that make productive dialogue possible.
  
  • COMM 322 - Discussion, Dissent and Debate


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A study of argument and refutation as applied to the debate situation. Emphasis is upon research, analysis, writing of argumentative briefs, and actual debating. Prerequisite: COMM 211  or permission of instructor.
  
  • COMM 343 - Business and Professional Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A course designed to apply communication theory to the solving of business or professional interpersonal problems. Stresses systems theory adapted to organizational structure, interviewing and conference techniques, as well as public speaking in professional settings. Prerequisite: COMM 211 .
  
  • COMM 345 - Intercultural Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Stresses understanding of contrasting cultures and ways of communicating with individuals and groups from around the world as well as subcultures within the United States. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
  • COMM 376 - Family Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    An in-depth analysis of communication theory and research related to the family.
  
  • COMM 383 - Communication in Multi-National Organizations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Designed to introduce students to intercultural communication theories applied to information needs and human resource management in multinational organizations.
  
  • COMM 392 - Rhetoric of Pop Culture


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    The course is designed to teach students the basics of rhetorical analysis and criticism as they relate to understanding and evaluating contemporary pop culture.
  
  • COMM 408 - Crisis Management in Organizations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Examines the theory and practice of crisis management in organizations from both social science and rhetorical perspectives. Using a case study approach and best practices for crisis management, students explore how to use communication to prevent, mitigate, and learn from crises in a way that benefits both organizations and stakeholders. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 415 - Political Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Develops knowledge of theory, practice, analysis and research that will help students become better consumers of political messages as well as prepare students who intend to work in politics. Graduate students will design and conduct research on the current campaign and analyze the results. Focus is on rhetorical construction rather than the political process. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 421 - Leadership and Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    The study of leadership emerging from communication skills, personal traits, group and historical situations. Special focus on small group and organizational leadership. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 430 - Conflict Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Develops conflict management knowledge and skill competencies through an interaction of theory, practice, and analysis. Among the instructional methods to be used are lectures, case studies, small groups, and conflict instruments.
  
  • COMM 436 - Nonverbal Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

    Theory and practice of nonverbal communication in relation to behaviors in numerous contexts and human interactions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 450 - Gender Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Explores the role of gender in communication processes including both physical and psychological dimensions. Topics include sex roles; perceived/actual differences in verbal/nonverbal communication behaviors; influence of gender in contexts such as family, school, and work organizations; and a discussion of media influence in creating/maintaining gender stereotypes. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 460 - Health Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course is a survey of communication in the healthcare context. The course explores the role of communication in healthcare delivery, health promotion and media, disease prevention, risk communication, social support, and human subjects protections. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 461 - Nonprofit Event Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course teaches students how to use communication skills in persuasion, leadership, conflict management, and networking to design and coordinate events for nonprofit organizations and groups. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor. Course fee.
  
  • COMM 462 - Executive Coaching


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course utilizes coaching theory, research, and skill-building as it applies to leadership performance and improvement. Students will take on the role of scholar and practitioner as they learn to apply theory in the field through in-class activities, case studies, and actual coaching practice. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and COMM 211 .
  
  • COMM 475 - Persuasion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Includes theories and principles of communication useful in a number of contexts where individual or group change is important. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 483 - Professional Presentations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    In-depth practice and principles of various public speaking situations. Prerequisite: COMM 211  with a grade of C or better.
  
  • COMM 485 - Organizational Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    The theory and function of communication within business, government, hospitals, schools, industrial firms, and other organizations, with emphasis on concepts and principles for effective information management. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
  • COMM 486 - Training and Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    The theory and skills involved in doing human resource training in organizations. Provides knowledge, skills, and experience in developing, presenting, and evaluating training programs. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; COMM 211 .
  
  • COMM 491 - Rhetorical Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Speakers and speeches of the ancient world, with historical background. Emphasis on rhetorical theories developed in Greek and Roman public address, as well as recent approaches to rhetorical situations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Will substitute for ENGL 329 . A writing-intensive course.
  
  • COMM 499 - Communication Internship


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Guided internship with seminar designed to place students in evaluative field experiences to utilize and test communication theory and practice. Prerequisite: Senior status and consent of instructor. A capstone course.
  
  • COMM 508 - Crisis Management in Organizations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Examines the theory and practice of crisis management in organizations from both social science and rhetorical perspectives. Using a case study approach and best practices for crisis management, students explore how to use communication to prevent, mitigate, and learn from crises in a way that benefits both organizations and stakeholders.
  
  • COMM 515 - Political Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Develops knowledge of theory, practice, analysis and research that will help students become better consumers of political messages as well as prepare students who intend to work in politics. Graduate students will design and conduct research on the current campaign and analyze the results. Focus is on rhetorical construction rather than the political process. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.
  
  • COMM 521 - Leadership and Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    The study of leadership emerging from communication skills, personal traits, group and historical situations. Special focus on small group and organizational leadership.
  
  • COMM 536 - Nonverbal Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

    Theory and practice of nonverbal communication in relation to behaviors in numerous contexts and human interactions.
  
  • COMM 545 - Intercultural Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Stresses understanding of contrasting cultures and ways of communicating with individuals and groups from around the world as well as subcultures within the United States.
  
  • COMM 550 - Gender Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Explores the role of gender in communication processes including both physical and psychological dimensions. Topics include rex roles; perceived/actual differences in verbal/nonverbal communication behaviors; influence of gender in contexts such as family, school, and work organizations; and a discussion of media influence in creating/maintaining gender stereotypes.
  
  • COMM 560 - Health Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course is a survey of communication in the healthcare context. The course explores the role of communication in healthcare delivery, health promotion and media, disease prevention, risk communication, social support, and human subjects protections.
  
  • COMM 561 - Nonprofit Event Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course teaches students how to use communication skills in persuasion, leadership, conflict management, and networking to design and coordinate events for nonprofit organizations and groups. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Course fee.
  
  • COMM 575 - Persuasion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Includes theories and principles of communication useful in a number of contexts where individual or group change is important.
  
  • COMM 583 - Communication in Multi-National Organizations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Designed to introduce students to intercultural communication theories applied to information needs and human resource management in multinational organizations.
  
  • COMM 585 - Organizational Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    The theory and function of communication within business, government, hospitals, schools, industrial firms, and other organizations, with emphasis on concepts and principles for effective information management.
  
  • COMM 586 - Training and Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    The theory and skills involved in doing human resource training in organizations. Provides knowledge, skills, and experience in developing, presenting, and evaluating training programs.
  
  • COMM 601 - Residency I: Ethics & Theory in Corporate Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Summer

    Provides an introduction to major concepts of theory, research, and ethics in corporate communication contexts.
  
  • COMM 620 - Quantitative Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Emphasis on the scientific method, survey research, laboratory research, sampling procedures, questionnaire construction, and interviewing techniques.
  
  • COMM 621 - Qualitative Research Methods


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course introduces graduate students to qualitative research methods. Students will understand the philosophical and ethical foundations of qualitative research, learn to identify research problems, generate research questions, develop a research design, collect and analyze data, and report findings.
  
  • COMM 631 - Leading Organizational Change


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course introduces students to the concept of the learning organization, equipping them with skills to create educational strategies for organizational change, and preparing them to reflect ethically on the implications of organizational change.
  
  • COMM 636 - Seminar in Communication Theory


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Major concepts of theory and research in the areas of verbal and nonverbal interaction, meaning, information, persuasion, interpersonal, group and organizational communication.
  
  • COMM 641 - Seminar in Interpersonal Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Explores theory and variables from the body of scientific literature dealing with interpersonal communication.
  
  • COMM 642 - Seminar in Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Various problems and concepts in communication. May be repeated with different content for a total of nine hours. May be repeated.
  
  • COMM 645 - Global Leadership: Leading in a Diverse Context


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    This course merges leadership with intercultural competence in the workforce, equipping leaders with the necessary intercultural awareness and mindset that promotes a thriving multicultural environment. Students will identify and overcome the challenges of leading in a cross-cultural context. Students will adopt communication skills to adapt their leadership styles to a complex cultural context.
  
  • COMM 675 - Seminar in Persuasion and Social Change


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Processes, theories and strategies by which group, organizational and cultural persuasion occurs by emphasizing diffusion of innovation strategies.
  
  • COMM 683 - Cultural Case Studies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Analysis of several intercultural encounters between U.S. citizens and foreigners in the latter’s cultural setting. Application of principles of cross-cultural involvement.
  
  • COMM 685 - Seminar in Organizational Communication


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    Current research that seeks to explain, interpret and analyze communication within public and private organizations.
  
  • COMM 686 - Communication Consulting and Assessment


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Methods used in assessing communication behavior in organizations, preparing intervention techniques, and evaluating communication effectiveness.
  
  • COMM 687 - Principles of Rhetorical Criticism


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Methodology course covering the different rhetorical theories used for criticism of either single rhetorical events or campaigns combining several symbolic events.
  
  • COMM 697 - OD Capstone


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Provides a culminating, student-centered experience in which students analyze, synthesize, and apply knowledge and skills from across their program to demonstrate mastery of the OD Learning Outcome and Competencies. Prerequisite: Student must have 30 hours of the degree plan successfully complete. A capstone course.
  
  • COMM 698 - Research Project Thesis Equivalent


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6
    To be presented with departmental approval, in lieu of the traditional thesis. This course is available for variable credit. Please see your advisor for more information.
 

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