2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II 
    
    Dec 06, 2022  
2019-2020 Catalog with Addendum II [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The information following course titles indicate (1) hours per week of lecture, (2) hours per week of laboratory and (3) semester credit hours. A small number of courses are offered for a variable number of credit hours, and the semester credit hours listed represent the maximum number of hours possible for credit. This will be noted in the course description.

The frequency of offering follows the meeting and credit hour information. Courses offered every year are designated by semester(s) only. Courses offered every other year are designated by semester and odd/even year.

Note: Since most courses are not offered every semester, students should be aware that failure to take a required course when it is offered may delay graduation.

Any course may be offered on demand should sufficient interest be demonstrated and should a qualified instructor be available. “Demand” courses with a defined content will be offered as regularly as practical for the host department.

At the end of the course description, the following information will be given when applicable: laboratory information, corequisites (“simultaneous enrollment”) and prerequisites, cross listed courses (“same as”), special fees, and pertinent information about the use of the course.

Courses and Numbering

All courses are listed alphabetically by course prefix and numerically within each prefix. The department and college assignments are also noted. ACU uses a three-digit course numbering system. Courses numbered 100 to 299 are lower-level courses (primarily for freshmen and sophomores). Courses numbered from 300 to 499 are upper-level, or advanced, courses (primarily for juniors and seniors). Courses numbered 500 to 799 are graduate courses. All courses numbered 000 to 099 do not count toward graduation or GPA.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Some courses have prerequisites, which must be met before a student may register for that course, or corequisites, which must be completed simultaneously. In some cases, a student may have special knowledge, skills or background that will enable him or her to perform well in a given class without meeting its prerequisites or corequisites. Such a student should seek special permission from the department offering the course.

A course may not use the same requirement as both prerequisite and corequisite. Courses listed as corequisite must be taken together. Students may not drop or withdraw from a course with corequisite requirements without dropping or withdrawing from both courses. Students may repeat a course with corequisite requirements alone in subsequent attempts if they fail or do not receive degree credit for the course on the first attempt. However, in courses with a subject code of EACH, EDUC, NURS, or SPAN, students must repeat both corequisite courses if they fail or do not receive credit for one or both courses on the first attempt.

Students should refer to the most recent catalog for course corequisites, prerequisites, and restrictions.

Course Sequencing

Some courses have recommendations of a previous course(s) for appropriate sequencing. Such recommendations are not prerequisites; the system will allow any student meeting a course’s prerequisites to enroll for a course regardless of whether the student meets the sequencing recommendations. Students are cautioned, however, to follow sequencing recommendations when all of the courses in the sequence are on their degree plans.

Independent Study and Special Topics Courses

Neither an independent study nor a special topics course should be a version or instance of a course that already has been approved for inclusion in the catalog.

Independent Study

An independent study course is a unique, student-initiated and student-driven course. An independent study course should be used to enhance a degree. It should be used as a substitution for degree requirements only in rare circumstances; it should not be used to correct poor planning. All other catalog policies apply.

Independent study courses are usually designed to be worth 3 credit hours. Ideally, independent study courses should make up no more than 6 hours (5 percent) of any student’s undergraduate degree. They should make up no more than 20 percent of any student’s graduate degree. Independent study courses should use the even hundred course number appropriate to the level of study (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, etc.)

Student proposals for independent studies may be approved or denied based on faculty interest or availability and departmental priorities. Students in the Doctor of Ministry (DMin) program will incur a separate fee for an independent study course and should contact the Director of the DMin Program for details.

When proposing an independent study, the student should complete the Independent Study Request form and discuss it – including the outcomes and artifacts of the study – with the proposed faculty member. Artifacts should support the student’s and the faculty member’s intended outcomes for the course through research, written work, creative projects, and/or professional projects. If the course is approved by the faculty member, the faculty member is responsible for creating the syllabus for the independent study. The syllabus must include the learning outcomes and how they will be measured.

The syllabus and Independent Study Request form should be submitted to the chair and dean on a timeline that would allow for the proposal to be approved or denied prior to the beginning of the term or part of term in which the course is being proposed. Study Abroad courses should be approved prior to departure from the United States.

Special topics

A special topics course is faculty/department-initiated and faculty-driven. A special topics course will be included in the course schedule for registration in a given term and could be used as a pilot for addition to the curriculum. A substitution form must be submitted for a special topics course to satisfy degree requirement. All other catalog policies apply.

The special topics syllabus must be submitted to the dean before March 1 for a fall course or October 1 for a spring or summer course, so that it will be available for student registration. Special topics courses should choose the course number appropriate to the level of study from the following: 140, 240, 340, 440, 540, 640, 740, etc.

The Texas Common Course Numbering System

The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) has been designed for the purpose of aiding students in the transfer of general academic courses between colleges and universities throughout Texas. Common courses are freshman and sophomore academic credit courses that have been identified as common by institutions that are members of the common course numbering system. The system ensures that if the student takes the courses the receiving institution designates as common, then the courses will be accepted in transfer.

For further information contact the transfer course coordinator in the Registrar’s Office.

 

Information Technology

  
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    IT 652 - Leading IT Innovation in Education: Solution Analysis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: rotating basis

    Systemic solution evaluation, design, and development associated with integrating emerging innovations in education. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school and/or digital leadership of learning certificate program.
  
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    IT 660 - Work-Product Portfolio


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 6
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Submission of a portfolio of work products and reflective experiences pertaining to IT operations in a corporate or other organizational environment. The portfolio must demonstrate breadth of experiences and knowledge, and may include examples that are either technical or administrative in nature. Up to six credit hours may be awarded. This course is available for variable credit. Please see your advisor for more information. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Information Technology Administration

  
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    ITA 110 - IT Fundamentals


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Provides an overview to the IT discipline, including computing technology basics, networking and communications, application programming, information and database management systems, and cybersecurity.
  
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    ITA 315 - Mobile Application Development for Information Technology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Students develop applications for mobile computing devices. Includes theory, concepts, and hands-on programming. Assumes a strong programming background. Prerequisite: ITO 220  and CSO 116 .
  
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    ITA 405 - Systems Development Processes and Methodologies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Traditional and Agile processes and methodologies. Overviews traditional system and product life cycle models, requirements gathering, analysis and design strategies, and the Agile philosophy, vocabulary, tools, and best practices. Prerequisite: CSO 116  and ITO 220 .
  
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    ITA 475 - Risk and Incident Planning and Response


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applies policies, standards, and guidelines in the design and development of Risk Management Plans and Incident Response Plans. Prerequisite: IT 473 .

Information, Technology, and Computing

  
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    ITC 110 - Introduction to Information, Technology, and Computing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    An introduction to the mindsets, concepts, and skills found in the disciplines of the School of Information, Technology, and Computing.
  
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    ITC 250 - History of Computing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course will examine the causes and development as well as the immediate and long-term effects of innovations in computing, to build a greater knowledge and appreciation of historical events and trends, and a fuller understanding of how computing has developed as a discipline and affected broader cultural history. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
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    ITC 399 - ITC Research


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, spring, summer

    This course is designed to enable the capable student to pursue research under the direction of a faculty member. Requirements include an annotated bibliography of relevant research and analysis of experimental data. This course may be taken for 1-3 hours of credit and may be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    ITC 460 - Managing Technical Projects


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Students apply knowledge in their major area an develop project management skills through oral and written analysis of cases and applied projects. Prerequisite: Course must be taken during the last year of the academic program. A capstone and writing-intensive course.
  
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    ITC 480 - Reflections on Faith and Work


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    The senior year integrative capstone experience will challenge students to critically analyze, synthesize, and write about the major discipline from the perspective of Christian Worldview. The capstone is a confluence of a liberal arts education where students are challenged to integrate their knowledge in technology, science, humanities, social sciences, and Bible. Prerequisite: Senior standing. A capstone and writing-intensive course.
  
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    ITC 499 - Information, Technology, and Computing Internship


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Field experience applying knowledge and skills from School of Information Technology and Computing disciplines in a professional setting. Prerequisite: Completion of all required 100- and 200- level CS, DET, IS, IT, and ITC courses; approval from direction of Internships. Same as ACCT 499 , FIN 499 , IS 499 , MGMT 499 , and MKTG 499 .

Journalism and Mass Communication

  
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    JMC 100 - Media Issues


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    An introduction to media, examining their impact on society and individuals. May be used to satisfy University Requirements.
  
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    JMC 111 - Announcing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Develop vocal and on-camera presentation skills to communicate effectively as talent in audio and video contexts. Areas of concentration include enunciation, pronunciation, writing, and interpreting copy.
  
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    JMC 165 - Media Maker


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Introduction to the techniques and practices involved with producing creative content for mass media. Students will work individually and in teams using industry-standard tools to create audio, photo, and video projects. Course fee.
  
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    JMC 201 - Introduction to Visual Media


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer as needed

    Principles and practice of visual communication including photo and video production using industry tools and techniques with an emphasis on digital storytelling. Prerequisite: JMC 100 .
  
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    JMC 224 - Media Writing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall; Spring, even years

    The understanding and practice of writing content applicable to a range of mass media formats, audiences, and purposes. The primary focus is on how to gather information and accurately transform it into appropriately styled messages for actual audiences. Prerequisite: JMC 100  and JMC 165 .
  
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    JMC 233 - Photography


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A study of the principles of photography with an emphasis on controlling exposure, digital production, analyzing photographs and creating images for publication. Requires use of instructor-approved digital camera. Prerequisite: JMC 165 .
  
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    JMC 261 - Broadcast Production


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Introduction to the live broadcast production environment including studio, control room, and camera operation to support entertainment, news, and sports programming. Prerequisite: JMC 165  or instructor approval. Course fee.
  
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    JMC 265 - Film Production


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Introduction to the filmmaking process from script to screen, including the basics of producing, cinematography, sound recording, production roles, and set etiquette. Storytelling and production craft are emphasized through hands-on exercises, projects and screenings Prerequisite: JMC 165 . Course fee.
  
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    JMC 302 - Introduction to Race and Media


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Short course, varying topics related to race in JMC professions. JMC 302 may not be repeated. (A companion course, JMC 303 , must be repeated once.) See Semester Schedule for current offerings. Colloquia are generally taken beginning in the fourth semester and may charge special fees for materials, travel or equipment. Prerequisite: Open to JMC majors and minors; also available by permission of instructor. Colloquia are generally taken beginning in the fourth semester.
  
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    JMC 303 - Colloquium in Race and Media


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer on demand

    Short course, varying topics related to race in JMC professions. JMC 302  may not be repeated. JMC 303 must be repeated once. See Semester Schedule for current offerings. Colloquia are generally taken beginning in the fourth semester and may charge special fees for materials, travel or equipment. Prerequisite: Open to JMC majors and minors; also available by permission of instructor. Colloquia are generally taken beginning in the fourth semester.
  
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    JMC 317 - Electronic Media Principles


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    An examination of electronic media principles, covering such topics as history, technology, regulation, news, advertising, programming, audience research, business practices, social impact, ethics, and careers. Prerequisite: JMC 224 ; junior standing.
  
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    JMC 321 - Student Media Lab


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 0
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This lab experience will enhance the practice of relevant skills at Morris+Mitchell, The Optimist, 99 West MEdia, ACUTV, or KACU. Two semesters are required. Journalism majors must spend both semesters in news positions at The Optimist or KACU. Ad/PR majors spend at least one semester on the Morris+Mitchell staff. Multimedia majors spend at least one semester on the 99 West staff. Prerequisite: JMC 224  and permission of the instructor. Graded credit/no credit. Course fee.
  
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    JMC 324 - Advanced Reporting


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A study of online, print and broadcast news media with an emphasis on public affairs reporting, computer assisted reports, in-depth reporting, ethics, and laboratory work in the JMC Network student media lab. Prerequisite: JMC 224 .
  
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    JMC 338 - Broadcast News and Sports


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    The study and practice of radio and television story forms with emphasis on information-gathering, broadcast writing, and media production methods Prerequisite: JMC 224 . Course fee.
  
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    JMC 341 - Editing and Content Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Principles and practice of editing and content management and writing display copy. Prerequisite: JMC 224 .
  
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    JMC 342 - Communication Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer as needed

    Principles of design and practices in print and digital formats, graphic information design, typographic presentation and history of publishing. Prerequisite: JMC 165 ; sophomore standing.
  
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    JMC 347 - Principles of Public Relations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Survey of the history, principles and tactics of public relations and corporate communications, with an emphasis on how organizations use public relations to maintain goodwill among their various publics and meet strategic objectives. Prerequisite: JMC 224 .
  
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    JMC 348 - Principles of Advertising


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Survey of the history, principles and practice of advertising, with an emphasis on the strategic process: research, creative and media strategy, production of messages, and evaluation of advertising effectiveness. Prerequisite: JMC 224 .
  
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    JMC 351 - Web Publishing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A conceptual and practical study of the principles and tools of Web publishing. Prerequisite: JMC 342 .
  
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    JMC 352 - Advanced Web Publishing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    An active study of the theory and application of web publishing techniques emphasizing adaptive, multi-platform design and development principles. Prerequisite: JMC 351 .
  
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    JMC 355 - Media Technology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    Principles and practices of designing and troubleshooting audio and video systems to support broadcast and film production. Prerequisite: JMC 261 . Course fee.
  
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    JMC 361 - Advanced Video Production


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Active study of the theory and application of commercial video techniques, emphasizing digital filmmaking, motion graphics, compositing, research and production management. Prerequisite: JMC 265 . Course fee.
  
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    JMC 364 - Media and Religion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    A study of the interaction of media and religion and the use of media by religious groups, with varying emphases depending upon current events and student needs. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    JMC 367 - Social Media


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A study of social media and the place of those tools in professional communication.
  
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    JMC 389 - Public Relations Writing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    A study of professional writing skills and formats commonly used in public relations and marketing communications. Emphasis placed on learning through application, case studies and lab exercises. Prerequisite: JMC 347 .
  
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    JMC 390 - Advertising Creativity and Copy Writing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Study and practice in message strategy, development and creation including market and target audience analysis, idea generation, concept development and copywriting with application to all major mediums. Prerequisite: JMC 342  and JMC 348 .
  
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    JMC 391 - Ad/PR Media Planning


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    Study and practice in evaluating and selecting media for marketing communications. Emphasis on strategy, audience measurement, budgeting, scheduling, buying and plan writing. Prerequisite: JMC 347 ; JMC 348 .
  
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    JMC 405 - Visual Portfolio


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: on demand

    Designed for seniors under collaborative instruction from an adviser or mentor for the preparation of a visual portfolio that showcases the student’s talents and abilities in media fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing; JMC 351  and JMC 361 .
  
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    JMC 441 - Topics in Journalism


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    Intensive study of an issue or current topic in modern journalism. Applies advanced journalism principles. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours of credit. Prerequisite: JMC 324 .
  
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    JMC 449 - Opinion Writing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    A theoretical and practical study of the editorial and column in the news media. Emphasis on critical thinking and writing about current problems. Prerequisite: JMC 224  and Junior standing.
  
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    JMC 450 - Feature Writing


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    A study of newspaper and magazine feature articles. Emphasis on identifying subjects, research, interviewing, and writing. Prerequisite: JMC 224  and Junior standing.
  
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    JMC 465 - Documentary Storytelling


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    Principles and practices of documentary storytelling. Students will experience all areas of production while planning, producing, and editing documentary projects. Prerequisite: JMC 224 . Course fee.
  
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    JMC 488 - Communication Law


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Freedom and responsibility of print and broadcast media ethically and legally. First Amendment principles and legal philosophy affecting the media and employees. Prerequisite: Junior standing; JMC 224  for majors. A writing-intensive course. Part of the department’s capstone experience.
  
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    JMC 492 - Ad/PR Campaigns


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Capstone course in organizing and conducting integrated marketing campaigns; including research, objective setting, strategy development, media selection, message concept and design, budgeting, account management, plan writing and presentation. Prerequisite: JMC 224  and JMC 389 .
  
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    JMC 495 - JMC Internship


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    On-the-job training for a minimum of 120 hours under the student’s JMC advisor and a supervisor at the internship site. Prerequisite: Junior standing and one of the following courses: JMC 347 , JMC 348 , JMC 324 , or JMC 261 . Part of the department’s capstone experience. May be taken twice for credit.

Latin

  
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    FLLA 111 - Elementary Latin I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, odd years

    Introduction to forms, uses, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on grammar and reading Latin texts. Prerequisite: E-ACT English, 19 or above; ENGL 003 /ENGL 004 ; or approval by department. Non-credit laboratory required.
  
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    FLLA 112 - Elementary Latin II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, even years

    A continuation of FLLA 111 . Prerequisite: FLLA 111  or equivalent through testing. Non-credit laboratory required.
  
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    FLLA 221 - Intermediate Latin I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, even years

    Continuation of the study of grammar and forms with increased reading of selected Latin texts. Prerequisite: FLLA 112  or equivalent through testing.
  
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    FLLA 222 - Intermediate Latin II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, odd years

    Selected readings from Latin authors along with grammar review as needed. Prerequisite: FLLA 221  or equivalent through testing.

Kinesiology

  
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    KINE 100 - Lifetime Wellness


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Examines the components of health fitness. Evaluates one’s current status and shows how to develop and maintain a healthful lifestyle. This is an activity class. Must be used to satisfy Kinesiology University Requirements. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 201 - Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall only

    KINE 201 examines the meaning of sport and recreation management in terms of scope, issues and future trends and provides the student with an overview of the different facets and career opportunities that are available. For majors only. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Course fee.
  
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    KINE 206 - Strength Training


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Theory and practice involving the development of muscular strength and muscular endurance. Fulfills KINE activity requirement. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 211 - Cross-Training


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: on demand

    A conditioning course that focuses on both cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength and endurance. Fulfills KINE activity requirement. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 232 - Structural Kinesiology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Anatomical foundations and mechanics of human motion; basic principles of motor skills.
  
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    KINE 241 - First Aid/CPR


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Basic first-aid and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. Special fee required.
  
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    KINE 291 - Basic Sports Medicine


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This is a basic athletic training course providing a study of athletic training room procedures stressing the practical aspects of care and prevention of athletic injuries. The course covers the cognitive, affective and psychomotor objectives of the athletic training procedures. Special fee required.
  
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    KINE 296 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    A study of athletic training room procedures stressing the advanced care and prevention of athletic injuries. The format will include lecture, group class discussion, and laboratories concerning the evalution, prevention, and care of athletically related injuries. Prerequisite: KINE 291 , BIOL 291 /BIOL 293 , BIOL 292 /BIOL 294 . Special fee required.
  
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    KINE 301 - Risk Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to study the management of risk in a sport and recreation setting. Prerequisite: KINE 201 .
  
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    KINE 302 - Medical Terminology


    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the language of the medical field, including word roots, prefixes and suffixes. The terminology will be specific to each system of the body. The course is presented in an electronic format using on-line technology.
  
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    KINE 303 - Ethics in Sport and Recreation Management


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    The course examines moral and ethical issues pertaining to sport and recreation. Students experience the ethical decision making process through opportunities for critical analysis by drawing upon their philosophical bases. Prerequisite: KINE 201 .
  
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    KINE 311 - Motor Behavior


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course provides an overview of the major theories in Motor Learning, Motor Control, and Motor Development. Prerequisite: KINE 232 ; Pre-PT and Pre-OT majors only.
  
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    KINE 321 - Sport Practicum


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Actual teaching of an activity strength training class. Prerequisite: KINE 241  and departmental approval. May be repeated for additional credit. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 322 - Fitness Practicum


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Actual teaching of an activity aerobics class. Prerequisite: KINE 241  and departmental approval. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 330 - Field Experience


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    A minimum of forty-five clock hours of on-site observation and aide work in a university, municipal, corporate, or private setting. Documentation of mastery of relevant skills will be required. May be repeated for additional credit. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 333 - Youth Activity Programs


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Theory and practice of age-appropriate motor activities related to youth development in a sport or recreational setting. This course will also focus on sport management and facilitation of organized opportunities for youth sport participation.
  
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    KINE 342 - Exercise Testing, Evaluation, and Prescription


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course offers practical application of theory of exercise science in order to provide the student with sufficient knowledge to evaluate fitness levels and develop, prescribe, and teach appropriate exercise programs with varying goals and populations. Prerequisite: KINE 232 .
  
  •  

    KINE 360 - Leadership and Management for Health Promotion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Designed to explore many leadership and management theories and practices with application in the fields of health promotion, sport, and recreation. A writing-intensive course.
  
  •  

    KINE 365 - Assessment of Injury I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course is a study of advanced techniques in management, assessment, and recognition of athletic injuries specifically related to the lower extremity (i.e. toes, foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, pelvis, thigh and lumbar spine). Prerequisite: KINE 291  and KINE 296 .
  
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    KINE 366 - Assessment of Injury II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course is a study of advanced techniques in management, assessment, and recognition of athletic injuries of the upper body. Prerequisite: KINE 291 , KINE 296 , and KINE 365 .
  
  •  

    KINE 372 - Exercise Physiology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    An examination of the effects of physical activity upon the human body. Lab required. Prerequisite: KINE 232 . Corequisite: KINE 373  except for coaching minors.
  
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    KINE 373 - Exercise Physiology Lab


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 1
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Laboratory experience offering hands-on practice in fitness testing and evaluation using state-of-the-art technology. Prerequisite: KINE 232 . Corequisite: KINE 372 .
  
  •  

    KINE 399 - Research Methods in Kinesiology and Nutrition


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A study of the research process in Kinesiology and Nutrition from inception to statistical analysis. The course includes how to read and interpret research reports and how to present a research proposal. Prerequisite: Junior standing. A writing-intensive course.
  
  •  

    KINE 401 - Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the legal aspects of Sport and Recreation. Prerequisite: KINE 301  and a 2.5 GPA. For majors only.
  
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    KINE 420 - Exercise Science Internship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 40
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Supervised field experience where the student is involved in a public, commercial, or private agency work environment, experiencing a variety of settings for a minimum of eight weeks (320 hours). Prerequisite: Approval of advisor, KINE 372 /KINE 373 , completion of 90 hours and a GPA of 2.7 for KGEN and KNHP tracks, GPA of 2.5 for KSRM track, GPA of 3.0 for KNAT track, and GPA of 3.2 for KNPT and KNOT tracks. Special fee is required. A capstone course.
  
  •  

    KINE 421 - Wellness Practicum


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Lab assistant in a Lifetime Wellness class. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. For majors only.
  
  •  

    KINE 450 - Personal Training


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    This course is designed to prepare students for the successful completion of the National Council on Strength and Fitness Personal Trainer Certification exam. Prerequisite: KINE 372 /KINE 373 .
  
  •  

    KINE 460 - Program Planning for Health Promotion


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Designed to provide theoretical application of programming concepts in the fields of health promotion, sport, and recreation, and practical application in such areas as writing a business proposal and related program proposals. Prerequisite: KINE 360 .
  
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    KINE 473 - Cardiovascular Physiology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    A study of the physiology of the cardiovascular system, cardiovascular diseases, and methods of evaluating the various portions of the system. Prerequisite: KINE 232  and KINE 372 .
  
  •  

    KINE 475 - Physical Activity, Disease, and Aging


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Overviews the physical process of aging, its effects on other dimensions of life, and the impact of physical activity and its relationship to quality of life. Study of the essential knowledge and skills necessary for physical activity instructors of older adults. Prerequisite: KINE 241 , KINE 372 /KINE 373 .
  
  •  

    KINE 476 - Application and Evaluation of Secondary Physical Education


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

    The application of specific teaching methods and evaluation techniques in the fields of health and physical education.
  
  •  

    KINE 477 - Therapeutic Exercise


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course is a study of therapeutic exercises designed to aid and implement a protocol to return athletes to participation. Prerequisite: KINE 291 , KINE 296 , KINE 365 , KINE 366 . Special fee required.
  
  •  

    KINE 480 - Training Program Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall

    Provides an in-depth investigation of the various theories that exist for the development of athletic fitness. Examines periodized training programs in strength, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, and peak performance in several major sports. Prerequisite: KINE 372  and completion of required majors activity courses.
  
  •  

    KINE 485 - Clinical Exercise Physiology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    This course is designed to advance the application of theoretical and practical guidelines of pre-exercise screening, exercise assessment, exercise interpretation, and exercise prescription. Prerequisite: At least Junior standing, KINE 372 , KINE 373 , KINE 473 .
  
  •  

    KINE 490 - Special Populations


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An overview of disabling conditions and a study of motor development and adapted programming for meeting the needs of exceptional individuals. This course will have a particular focus on inclusion in sport and/or recreational settings.
  
  •  

    KINE 491 - Principles of Coaching


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    An advanced course in methods which are common to coaching all sports. Included are program design, psycho-social factors, communication skills, ethics, and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: Junior standing. KINE 232  and KINE 372  recommended.
  
  •  

    KINE 492 - Coaching Internship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 160
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

    Supervised field experience in which the student is contracted as a non-paid coaching assistant in a secondary or collegiate setting for a period of at least 160 hours. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA, senior standing, KINE 491 . Special fee required.
  
  •  

    KINE 498 - Biomechanics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Terms Offered: Spring

    Practical application of analysis, diagnosis, and demonstration as used in a teaching situation. Prerequisite: KINE 232 .

Organizational Leadership

  
  •  

    LEAD 701 - Introduction to Doctoral Studies


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Invites Ed.D. students to the academic practices, virtues, and resources of the scholar practitioner. This is one of three courses designed to provide students with a shared foundation of knowledge and skills on which to build their doctoral studies.
  
  •  

    LEAD 711 - Theories and Practices of Effective Leadership


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines classical and contemporary theories and styles of leadership and their application to a variety of professional settings. Incorporates the student’s experiences and observations regarding leadership from their personal and professional experiences and current work setting. Students will examine principal foundations of leadership, such as one’s values, philosophy of life, and beliefs about the nature of humankind.
  
  •  

    LEAD 714 - Self-Assessment in Leadership


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Assists students in understanding personal leadership styles including personality type and communication style. Exposes students to relevant literature on emotional intelligence and interpersonal neurobiology as it relates to leadership. Students will reflect upon the role of Christian vocation and calling in their leadership development.
  
  •  

    LEAD 721 - Contemporary Issues in Organizational Leadership


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines current political and social trends impacting organizations on both a macro- and micro-level. Students will appreciate the complexity of moral dilemmas through critical analysis and application of ethical principles.
  
  •  

    LEAD 724 - Leadership in Diverse Contexts


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces students to relevant literature and practices of leading diverse groups. Includes examination of the leader’s own social location and attitudes regarding diversity as well as the capacity to develop trust and shared motivations among diverse group members. Students will learn tools and concepts to resolve tensions, maximize strengths of diverse team members, support collaboration, and create welcoming and inclusive environments.
  
  •  

    LEAD 731 - Leading Organizational Change


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on planning and managing change and provides frameworks and tools to implement it. Participants will examine personal and organizational approaches to dealing with change through case studies, exercises, and extensive group discussions. Assignments will focus on opportunities for change within the participants’ own organizations.
  
  •  

    LEAD 741 - Human Resource Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the student to a framework for helping employees develop their personal and organizational skills, knowledge, and abilities. Topics will include employee training, employee career development, performance management and development, coaching, mentoring, succession planning, key employee identification, and organization development.
  
  •  

    LEAD 744 - Technology and Financial Resource Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Explores concepts and methods related to developing technological and financial resources, risk and return, asset evaluation, capital budgeting, capital structure, financial planning, and working capital management. It also examines a range of topics related to technology management including technology forecasting, implementation, and new product development.
  
  •  

    LEAD 765 - Applied Research Problem


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    This course supports student progress toward the dissertation through the creation of a viable, research-supported problem statement. Topics include: understanding the function and components of a problem statement, using peer-reviewed research to justify the problem statement, and connecting the problem statement to leadership concepts and the student’s specialization. Prerequisite: Approved Declaration of Research Interest and associated bibliography.
  
  •  

    LEAD 781 - Organizational Assessment and Evaluation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines key concepts, methods, and approaches in the field of evaluation research. Students will be exposed to theoretical and methodological options in current evaluation practice across social service, education, and business contexts. The comprehensive range of activities involved in designing, implementing, and assessing organizational effectiveness will be explored. Prerequisite: Acceptance into EdD program.
  
  •  

    LEAD 784 - Qualitative and Action Research


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3
    Engages students in the study of qualitative and action research methods. Students will understand the theoretical and philosophical foundations of qualitative research and be introduced to qualitative methodology. Students will study the process of action research focusing on improvement in the leader’s practices, his/her understanding of those practices, and the organizational contexts in which those practices are carried out.
 

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